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Vascular Dementia

SherwoodSue

Registered User
Jun 18, 2022
17
0
Hello lovely people ,

Mum had her first stroke 2019. Today we had our Vascular Dementia diagnosis. Mum is 86 and has COPD too. I would be interested to hear of folks’ experience of progression from diagnosis onwards. Good or awful. As we have been chugging along with the odd drama and some home support only, I have perhaps an unrealistic view that as changes have been slow so far , future changes may be slow to develop also.
would love to hear from you
 

Ray Brading

New member
Jun 18, 2022
3
0
Hi Sue,
My father was diagnosed with vascular dementia 2 years ago and the progression was shocking. From memory loss to hallucinations then an angry side . All unexpected. He is in a care home and then started stealing things from the lounge and storing them in his room. He is now 90 yrs old and we have come to the end stage. He now sleeps all day , does not know me anymore and in incontinent. He hardly eats and has lost so much weight that he is just a frail old man now. I am at the stage where i am praying for the angel of mercy to help him.
Sue, appreciate your Mum now and be ready for the change however small.
I am no expert, i am just sharing my experience.
Ray
 

SherwoodSue

Registered User
Jun 18, 2022
17
0
Hi Sue,
My father was diagnosed with vascular dementia 2 years ago and the progression was shocking. From memory loss to hallucinations then an angry side . All unexpected. He is in a care home and then started stealing things from the lounge and storing them in his room. He is now 90 yrs old and we have come to the end stage. He now sleeps all day , does not know me anymore and in incontinent. He hardly eats and has lost so much weight that he is just a frail old man now. I am at the stage where i am praying for the angel of mercy to help him.
Sue, appreciate your Mum now and be ready for the change however small.
I am no expert, i am just sharing my experience.
Ray
Thank you. Not easy to write I am sure. It does help frame things. Thank you for this.
 

Morg

Registered User
Oct 21, 2018
41
0
My mum showed signs of forgetfulness 9 years ago. Actual diagnosis 6 years ago.
mum still generally ok - in a residential home because she needs company and support. I think there are huge variations. I know when mum was first diagnosed I looked everywhere for answers and timelines. Lots of support here from lots of lovely experienced people.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,139
0
Bristol
Hullo Sue and a belated welcome to the forum,

My partner had vascular dementia diagnosed about a year after a stroke. She appeared to be slowly recovering from her stroke until a series of UTIs ended in a seizure about two and a half years after the stroke. That was when her confusion got so much worse that I realised what we were up against. That was the point at which outside care support was needed. She still managed to get out with me on day trips to Devon and into south Wales a couple of summers after that, but had to pace herself a lot more. Covid restrictions meaning she could not get out to day centre or trips out for tea and cakes as often led to her becoming less mobile. It is my understanding that Vascular Dementia does typically progress in steps and that would certainly correspond with C's experience.
https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/types-dementia/vascular-dementia#content-start might help you as well,
 

SherwoodSue

Registered User
Jun 18, 2022
17
0
Thank you all for your replies. I think perhaps there is an illusion that if we have information we are somehow armed and prepared. Increasingly I am coming to understand that this journey has to be about here and now thinking. Taking each day as it comes etc. I am trying. Not easy for a plan your work and work your plans kinda gal.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
11,877
0
Southampton
Hello lovely people ,

Mum had her first stroke 2019. Today we had our Vascular Dementia diagnosis. Mum is 86 and has COPD too. I would be interested to hear of folks’ experience of progression from diagnosis onwards. Good or awful. As we have been chugging along with the odd drama and some home support only, I have perhaps an unrealistic view that as changes have been slow so far , future changes may be slow to develop also.
would love to hear from you
my husband has vascular dementia diagnosed 2020. he also has COPD as well. he had a clot in his heart leading to a mini-stroke in 2019. was very obvious that he was having problems with memory.
vascular usually goes in steps. there would be a step down and then plateau for a while before another step. every persons journey is different, going through different stages at different times. there is a booklet you can get from here if you go to publications and there is a booklet on vascular dementia. it might give you a general idea. i cant post the link but someone may post the link.
 

yosser

Registered User
Nov 12, 2020
208
0
SherwoodSue I suffer with Vascular Dementia, was diagnosed, over three years ago now . I am 75 years old , from a personal point of view I don't really have the same sort of problems as most people, due to the fact I keep myself fit by walking, working out , reading ,word search, listening to music .Diet for the brain fatty fish, coffee, blueberries, turmeric, broccoli, nuts, Oranges, eggs, dark chololate, just some of some things I eat which all help me to stay normal as possible .
 

SherwoodSue

Registered User
Jun 18, 2022
17
0
my husband has vascular dementia diagnosed 2020. he also has COPD as well. he had a clot in his heart leading to a mini-stroke in 2019. was very obvious that he was having problems with memory.
vascular usually goes in steps. there would be a step down and then plateau for a while before another step. every persons journey is different, going through different stages at different times. there is a booklet you can get from here if you go to publications and there is a booklet on vascular dementia. it might give you a general idea. i cant post the link but someone may post the link.
Thank you Jennifer
I have read EVERYTHING I can find about VaD on line. I am familiar with the step down idea of progression but that isn’t what I am seeing. Mum does step down after hospital admissions for example but bounces back afterwards 🙂. Alternatively from nowhere she will have 2-3 really ropey days , recently had one of these and dropped scalding coffee in her lap after which she again recovers. I am now wondering if this was aTIA. One doctor said on blood thinners mum probably wouldn’t have any more TIAs. I now think that wasn’t right.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
11,877
0
Southampton
Thank you Jennifer
I have read EVERYTHING I can find about VaD on line. I am familiar with the step down idea of progression but that isn’t what I am seeing. Mum does step down after hospital admissions for example but bounces back afterwards 🙂. Alternatively from nowhere she will have 2-3 really ropey days , recently had one of these and dropped scalding coffee in her lap after which she again recovers. I am now wondering if this was aTIA. One doctor said on blood thinners mum probably wouldn’t have any more TIAs. I now think that wasn’t right.
blood thinners can reduce the risk of TIA but i dont think it can irradicate them entirely. he has his bad days when he doesnt always understand or does things and doesnt know why. it is so individual that no 2 people are the same. he has what i call a vacant look sometimes when i talk to him and know he has not heard or not understand. they took my husbnand off of blood thinners.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
2,548
0
cornwall
Thank you Jennifer
I have read EVERYTHING I can find about VaD on line. I am familiar with the step down idea of progression but that isn’t what I am seeing. Mum does step down after hospital admissions for example but bounces back afterwards 🙂. Alternatively from nowhere she will have 2-3 really ropey days , recently had one of these and dropped scalding coffee in her lap after which she again recovers. I am now wondering if this was aTIA. One doctor said on blood thinners mum probably wouldn’t have any more TIAs. I now think that wasn’t right.
Hi. My dad has VD. Diagnosed in 2015.He is 89 and has 3 TIA's in a week. He suffered a severe stroke about 5 years ago. The doctor wasn't right. She can still have TIA's. Dad has had one in the midst of holding a fork. Dad is in bed now 20 hours out of 24. He recognises me and can have a reasonable conversation but lacks capacity majority of the time.
 

SherwoodSue

Registered User
Jun 18, 2022
17
0
Hi. My dad has VD. Diagnosed in 2015.He is 89 and has 3 TIA's in a week. He suffered a severe stroke about 5 years ago. The doctor wasn't right. She can still have TIA's. Dad has had one in the midst of holding a fork. Dad is in bed now 20 hours out of 24. He recognises me and can have a reasonable conversation but lacks capacity majority of the time.
Thank you for taking the time to reply. It seems an extended period of ill health your poor dad has had to endure, I do take comfort from the fact that he recognises you. It is also helpful to know about the TIAs
Thank you
 

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