1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Chezza69

    Chezza69 Registered User

    Jul 8, 2015
    1
    Hi. My Mum cares for my Dad who is in his early eighties full time but coping with the urinating is getting harder and harder. He usually knows when he wants to go but unless she is watching him constantly he will pee in really random places. If she can see that he needs to go she will take him in to the bathroom but he will very often refuse to go down the toilet not believing that is where he should go.

    Sometimes he cant get his zip down fast enough and pees himself and sometimes he says he want to pee but doesn't know what to do.

    She's tried putting pads on him but he either pulls them out or it just makes it harder for him if he does remember what to do.

    Any suggestions of anything we could try would be very much appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,561
    North West
    Hi Chezza69 and welcome to TP.

    I can tell you that the problems you describe are shared by many members. I haven't had this particular problem but I do understand from previous threads how frustrating it must be to try to sort it out.

    I hope you'll soon get some suggestions from people who have 'been there'.
     
  3. cragmaid

    cragmaid Registered User

    Oct 18, 2010
    7,963
    North East England
    I'm sorry I cannot help much, I'm afraid this is not a problem my Mum suffered, but from various sources I can offer...pull ups( tena type) rather than separate pad...that way he might manage to not pull them away and pull up trousers or track suit/jogger bottoms rather than belt,zip or buttonned trousers are quicker to pull down.
    Ask the incontinence nurse attached to your GP for advice.
     
  4. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,839
    Suffolk
    Pull ups, definately. Near enough to pants for no quibbles. The nappy type ones used to be shredded!
    Also a urine bottle for night use, which worked well with OH for a while. He had no objection to it, fortunately.
     
  5. Emmy_83

    Emmy_83 Registered User

    Mar 8, 2014
    72
    Yorkshire
    Yes my dad has a plastic jug next to the bed that he uses if he thinks he's not going to make it to the toilet.

    I think the doctor also prescribed him tablets to help and he's also on a low dose of antibiotic which staves off reoccurring infections that he kept getting.
     
  6. Emmy_83

    Emmy_83 Registered User

    Mar 8, 2014
    72
    Yorkshire
    My dad has a plastic jug next to the bed that he uses if he thinks he's not going to make it to the toilet.

    He's also on a low dose of antibiotic which staves off reoccurring infections that he kept getting.
     
  7. Feline

    Feline Registered User

    Oct 25, 2012
    164
    East Devon
    It is a very difficult stage, pull up pants are probably the best way forward ,he will have to pay for them himself unless he becomes incontinent in which case contact D N and have a continence assessment done. He may then get pants funded by NHS.
    Regular toileting may help, take him at intervals and he may go and it won't be so urgent to sort the trousers etc. also avoid too much coffee because of it being a diuretic continue with other drinks, also a toilet surround may help, (contact OT) so that it might encourage him to sit down and go into the toilet, wishing you luck
     
  8. Keepingup

    Keepingup Registered User

    Jul 13, 2015
    12
    we've found the pants to be the best solution all round. Not always needed by Mum if she's reminded to go to the loo but there for emergencies so much easier for us (or carers if in) to deal with.

    We were advised to use the large (well massive) pads but they irritated and confused her and it wasn't difficult to understand this, I think most people would feel the same.
     

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