Urinary Tract Infections - Does it make advanced Alzheimers worse?

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by Shakey1961a, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. Shakey1961a

    Shakey1961a Registered User

    Nov 7, 2004
    111
    Southport
    Hi all.

    Mum is prone to urine infections. I presume an infection can raise a persons temperature.

    When a person has an infection and/or a raised temperature can it make an Alzheimers patient more confused and say silly and stupid things which would be out of character for that person even with Alzheimers?

    If so has anyone had any experience?

    Thansk for your help.

    Regards

    Steve
     
  2. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hi Steve

    A person with a urinary infection who has Alzheimer's may well do or say all sorts of unusual things, and behave very erratically, seemingly for no reason.

    When Jan is particularly warm, or when her confusion is abnormally strong, the thing I have learned to ask right away is - does she have an infection.

    One problem with diagnosing such a thing is that normally, a urine sample is taken. With a person who has to use pads, that is such a difficult thing to organise!
     
  3. Sheila

    Sheila Registered User

    Oct 23, 2003
    2,259
    West Sussex
    Dear Steve, yes Brucie is right, like Jan, my Mum was always more "odd" when she had a UTI. Why, does your Mum appear unwell and appear to perhaps have one now, are you worried it has not been dealt with and medication prescribed yet? As Brucie says, it's difficult to get a specimen in some circumstances. If you are worried, you could do as he suggests and mention your concern, thats what I would do too. Love She. XX
     
  4. Shakey1961a

    Shakey1961a Registered User

    Nov 7, 2004
    111
    Southport
    Hi all. Thanks for the replies.

    Can a person get the effects (confusion and odd behaviour etc...)of an infection a day or two before it's noticable by others?

    It's just my ongoing legal case. Mum said a few odd things (so what's new) and was upset and weepy and said "I'm sick of it" etc when she was getting ready for bed by the nurse. The nurse even said the day after that mum wasn't feeling well and had a temperature.

    Would an infection make it difficult for Mum to distinguish male and female? Or is that just another manifestation of Alzheimer's made worse with an infection?

    It's just adding more weight to my defence and showing how stupid the prosecution are in continuing it.

    I've written a letter to the Society. I know it'll tell me a bit more than what you've said, but essentially it'll be the same, but if it's on headed paper and from an official source it looks better for my team and in court.

    Many thanks for all your continuing help.

    Regards

    Steve
     
  5. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hello Steve

    yes is the answer, because as far as I know, there is a stage before infections become visible when the body is affected. It would be best to check that out because I'm no doctor, mind! It just seems logical to me....

    Even when there are signs - usually cloudy urine is one [which you can't see with pads, of course] - the patient is unlikely to be in a state to notice, and if the nursing staff or carers don't notice the other symptom I have seen - temperature - then it may be some time before the infection is identified.
     
  6. Sheila

    Sheila Registered User

    Oct 23, 2003
    2,259
    West Sussex
    Hi, the pads may smell offensive, that's another sign. Love She. XX
     
  7. Shakey1961a

    Shakey1961a Registered User

    Nov 7, 2004
    111
    Southport
    This is all very encouraging. Helps my case no end.

    Why has it taken me 6 months to think of it. Still better late than never.

    Hope everyone is ok and coping well.

    I'll keep in touch.

    Regards

    Steve
     

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