understanding the process

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by scooby, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. scooby

    scooby Registered User

    Dec 7, 2004
    6
    My Sister is 57 years old, she has had alzheimers disease for 10 years now, well that is as far back as we can remember the symptoms starting.
    her syptoms for this is now she has trouble with her speach hard for dressing herself she cannot do anything for herself really.
    she still remembers us and our names but anybody she hasnt seen for a long time she forgets
    she had an assessment 2 weeks ago and they have said that she is in the 2nd and going into the 3rd stage and she could go rapidly and be in a home between 6 months to 2 years.
    afyer reading papers about it i still cannot see the 3rd stage.
    is this because i dont want to see it or what.
    i still feel it hard to understand all the process of AD
     
  2. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    Scooby
    I don't think there is a process or progress the same for everyone.
    the only certainty is that we end at the same destination,unless some other disease intervenes.
    I am sure that someone with a sufferer of a similar age will give you more infomation.
    Keep posting you will find lots of help on this site.
    Norman
     
  3. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hi Scooby

    I agree with Norman, I don't think there is any single course for Alzheimer's - or indeed for any of the dementias.

    Because the damage is to random parts of the brain, different faculties will be affected at different times for different people. Some people won't be affected in some areas, but will be more affected elsewhere.

    The internal strength of the person concerned also is part of the equation. Some fight it more; some go quite quickly.

    My wife, who is now 64, was 50 when things started to go wrong. As far as stages are concerned, we went approximately through this series of stages:

    Stage 1 1990 - 1997

    initial symptoms [memory, fainting]. Unable to get a diagnosis. Exploring what might be wrong by visiting many different consultants and paying for their holidays [had medical insurance through my employer]. Early medication for depression. life could still continue, more or less normally. I figured out what the problem was, early on, but the medics would not agree - she was 'too young' for dementia.

    Stage 2 1997 - 2000

    symptoms increase. Finally a diagnosis of Alzheimer's [later vascular was added]and assessment. Inability to write name. behavioural problems - sundowning. increase in medication. trying to handle it from home with no help from anyone. Arrange EPA. Still just able to care for her.

    Stage 3 2000 - 2001

    symptoms worsen. starts not to know me. agitation. aggression. severe sundowning. have to care for her 24/7 no help available from SS or elsewhere

    Stage 4 2001

    on 3rd assessment the hospital lets my wife fall, fracturing her pelvis. this made her incontinent for the first time, something that has continued since. She has also never walked since. Care needs thereafter too severe to enable her to come home. EPA activated.

    Stage 5 2001 - [present] could be 1 week more, or 10 years +

    in care home as permanent resident. loses sight, speech, most faculties. can still crawl and eats well. Strong as an ox. Brave as brave can be. Still beautiful.

    I'd expect no-one to have the same process, but that's what it has been like for us.

    Don't expect any or all of the above. Enjoy each day. Manage problems day by day.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.