Understanding scores. M-ACE and Bristol Daily Living

Discussion in 'Welcome and how to use Dementia Talking Point' started by Georgetown, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Georgetown

    Georgetown Registered User

    Aug 30, 2017
    10
    My dad has just received a M-ACE score of 74/100 ... he is 83 years old and was very anxious during the test... he certainly can't draw a clock / clock face! - His doctor asked him to do this previously and he simply couldn't do it!

    His Bristol Daily Living Score is 8 - which reflects his strong ability and independence - I understand this one!

    However, I can't find ANY info on line regarding an 'age adjusted' M-ACE score and am wondering if anyone has any further info re this....all I have found is that below 82 indicates likelihood of some sort of dementia/ alzheimer's etc... :confused:

    A brain scan appointment is currently being arranged but I'm concerned, and impatient (!) re understanding the implications
     
  2. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,429
    I think perhaps this wasn't the m-ace? That is scored out of 30. Could it have been the one of the other ACE tests?
     
  3. Georgetown

    Georgetown Registered User

    Aug 30, 2017
    10
    Ah - yes that one was 17/30
    and her Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination - ACE - 111 was 74/100

    and his Geriatric Depression scale is also positive 2/15

    thanks for any advice/ comments
     
  4. Agzy

    Agzy Registered User

    Nov 16, 2016
    827
    Moreton, Wirral. UK.
    My OH scored 16 in this the other week but what does it indicate in terms of dementia?
     
  5. Georgetown

    Georgetown Registered User

    Aug 30, 2017
    10
    I've done a bit of reading today ... I think there is a lower cut off indicator of 21.... suggesting that below this there is an indication of possible dementia .... BUT the follow up with phsyciatrist and a brain scan has also been arranged for dad ... he seems v sharp and with it in lots of ways so I'm hoping the news isn't too grim ... the test itself made him extremely anxious and outside of a 'medical test' I do think he'd have scored higher ... but what will be will be and only time will tell. Hardest part right now is managing the anxiety when he seems to be otherwise living so well ....
     
  6. Georgetown

    Georgetown Registered User

    Aug 30, 2017
    10
    Phsyciatrist follow up appointment

    Following the results of the scores Dad has now been invited to a follow up appointment with a Physciatrist... can anyone help re what to expect here? PLEASE no more 'tests' - it doesn't seem fair to put him through more of the same!! Still awaiting brain scan appointment.....
     
  7. Georgetown

    Georgetown Registered User

    Aug 30, 2017
    10
    I'm finding it frustratingly difficult to find info re what the scores mean. All of the academic reports (and believe me I've searched LOADS!) report on cases up to age 75! There seems to be no general age related scoring.... and I've been talking to a friend recently who's father scored 10 but DIDN't have dementia - just got confused during the test!!
    Roll on the slow process of diagnosis etc....
     
  8. ITBookworm

    ITBookworm Registered User

    Oct 26, 2011
    451
    Glasgow
    Hi Georgetown,

    I think it is safe to say that you have the same sort of engineering brain as my husband :D:D:D You want logical answers for everything and unfortunately the human brain and body don't seem to work that way.

    Part of the reason you aren't finding anything about age related scoring is that age is not the only significant factor affecting the results. My father-in-law had test results, from memory, of something like 21 in the test out of 30 which was only borderline as dementia on the numbers alone. He was 82/83 at the time and it was blindingly obvious from his actions and other information that he had dementia but that particular test didn't show it as clearly. He was a highly intelligent and highly practical man who had run a manufacturing company before he retired. An engineering brain which he passed on to his son :rolleyes:. It was those factors which kept his scores, in effect, artificially high and not any connection to his age or otherwise.

    Basically all the testing can do is highlight areas where there might be problems. Different tests will have different emphasis. Comparison of results across time can help show decline or otherwise but other than that they only serve as an indication.

    Our initial appointment with the Psychiatrist (at the same time as the initial tests) was basically a chat to see if FIL could understand and answer questions at a level that matched the test results. So asking about his childhood, education, his recent history that sort of thing. In an unscripted situation like that FIL's problems were a lot more obvious.

    When all the tests were in (blood to check for vitamin deficiencies etc, brain scan, scores from the written ones) we had a follow-up chat which basically said the results suggest dementia (alzheimers in his case) and did he want medication. FIL didn't accept there was any problem so said no which we accepted as his choice.

    I am pretty sure he didn't really understand what having dementia meant (no close relations or friends with it that I am aware of) so wasn't unduly upset by being told he had it - whether he believed it or not. I am aware that that is not always the case so if your dad will be seriously upset by that sort of discussion it might be a plan to let the psychiatrist know that in advance.
     

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