1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Squidgy1

    Squidgy1 Registered User

    Dec 22, 2014
    8
    Westhoughton
    my mum has FLT dementia and vascular dementia and is in respite. I'm viewing homes for permanent care, but I'm confused at the type of care mum needs. Our social worker says mum is residential with EMI and that that the types of care are residential, EMI and EMI Zero? The homes I've looked at seem to be Residential, EMI or nursing. Could someone please translate.
     
  2. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,308
    Male
    North Manchester
    The terms used vary with different areas, but I'll have a go at clarifying.

    Residential - infirm, no nursing requirement, not suffering with dementia.

    Residential with nursing - nursing required.

    Residential dementia - suffering with dementia, secure building, dementia trained carers.

    Residential with EMI - suffering with dementia, secure building, dementia trained carers and nurses.

    EMI stands for elderly mentally infirm is an old term that does not appear in current CQC documentation.

    I've never heard of EMI Zero.

    There are also statements about staffing levels and the phrase to be used where a person suffers with advanced dementia, does not have any challenging behaviour, and requires nursing.

    In the final analysis there should be a care plan in place that can be shown to prospective care homes who can then decide whether they wish to do an assessment as to whether or not they will accept the person. Worrying about how the home is described is in some respects a waste of time.
     
  3. Squidgy1

    Squidgy1 Registered User

    Dec 22, 2014
    8
    Westhoughton
    Thank you so much that clears things up a bit, it's all so confusing I'm going for a second viewing at a care home today and taking dad so I'll get a copy of her care plan first to take with us. My mum has very challenging behaviour which is why we can't care for her at home.
     

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