• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can be found in our area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

Trouble eating?

chelsea girl

Registered User
Jan 25, 2015
139
Mum went to day care yesterday and they phoned me to say she was choking on her food! They said i should get the doctor out to her. The doc is coming at lunchtime and i was wondering if anyone knows what she will do to determine if mum has a problem? Will she look down her throat? What will happen? Cant see how they will find out theres a problem!! If she has a problem whats the next step?. Hope someone can help me. Xx
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
71,952
Kent
Hello chelsea girl

I hope the GP will refer your mother to a Speech Therapist. They are able to advise about eating and swallowing difficulties.
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,709
North West
Although I understand the day care staff's concern and it is well worth discussing the issue with your GP, this could just be a 'one off' event. After all, you don't have to have dementia to occasionally choke on your food. Have you noticed that she has a tendency to choke? Did the staff tell you what your mum was eating? These are the kind of things that the GP may ask
 

chelsea girl

Registered User
Jan 25, 2015
139
Although I understand the day care staff's concern and it is well worth discussing the issue with your GP, this could just be a 'one off' event. After all, you don't have to have dementia to occasionally choke on your food. Have you noticed that she has a tendency to choke? Did the staff tell you what your mum was eating? These are the kind of things that the GP may ask
Hi, its not the first time the day care has said she was choking, they cut up her food for her and yesterday she had turkey! We always give her softer food like shepards pie or pasta so havent really noticed it at home. She takes ages to eat and chews and chews before swallowing?
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,709
North West
A lot of chewing can only be a good thing I reckon. It may be that they could offer her food on which she's less likely to choke and it's interesting if she doesn't choke on the food you give her. It will be interesting to get the GP's view. Please keep us posted.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
21,038
North Manchester
"... i was wondering if anyone knows what she will do to determine if mum has a problem? "

My experience with the Speech And Language Therapist (SALT) was that they first got background details about the problem and looked in the mouth for any soreness/inflammation.

They then asked for some yoghurt and a spoon and fed my wife the yoghurt, watched how she swallowed, felt her throat whilst swallowing and also listened with a stethoscope.
 

chelsea girl

Registered User
Jan 25, 2015
139
A lot of chewing can only be a good thing I reckon. It may be that they could offer her food on which she's less likely to choke and it's interesting if she doesn't choke on the food you give her. It will be interesting to get the GP's view. Please keep us posted.
I will do thank you. X
 

chelsea girl

Registered User
Jan 25, 2015
139
"... i was wondering if anyone knows what she will do to determine if mum has a problem? "

My experience with the Speech And Language Therapist (SALT) was that they first got background details about the problem and looked in the mouth for any soreness/inflammation.

They then asked for some yoghurt and a spoon and fed my wife the yoghurt, watched how she swallowed, felt her throat whilst swallowing and also listened with a stethoscope.
Oh thank you thats just the sort of info i wanted . I feel ready now for the doctors visit x
 

CJinUSA

Registered User
Jan 20, 2014
1,121
eastern USA
dysphagia and aphagia

My mother has dysphagia and aphagia - difficulty swallowing. We use a product called Thick It, which helps make the food softer. Turkey is probably too dry for her to swallow without some kind of softening agent.

We buy Thick It in a bottle form, and we have the dry crystals as well.

Eating problems can be caused by other things, but dementia patients (indeed all older individuals) develop difficulty swallowing because they aspirate irregularly. I don't know whether the folks at the day center can accommodate this, but as the problem is so common, they ought to learn how to handle it, it would seem to me.