1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. FloC

    FloC Registered User

    Jul 21, 2015
    5
    Hi. My brother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's about eighteen months ago. He lives alone but has a close friend and neighbour who cares for him. The other day she arrived in the morning to find that he had trashed his sitting room. Furniture was overturned, pictures off the walls and belongings scattered around. She woke him up and asked him what had happened but he had no recollection at all. This is not something that has happened before. Does anyone have any similar experiences?
     
  2. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,721
    Female
    Dundee
    If this is very unusual behaviour for him I wondered if it would be worth having him checked for a urine infection. I know my mother always became quite aggressive when she had a UTI.
     
  3. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    9,765
    Merseyside
    Welcome to TP Flo:)

    As Izzy says it could be a UTi. Ask the GP to check him over.
     
  4. FloC

    FloC Registered User

    Jul 21, 2015
    5
    Thanks. He has been checked but no UTI and so the doctor sent him to hospital where they are doing more tests. He is even more confused in hospital and keeps removing the heart monitor. He thinks that he is at the golf club where he used to play.Poor guy!
     
  5. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,721
    Female
    Dundee
    Oh what a shame. I hope they can help him.
     
  6. lizzybean

    lizzybean Registered User

    Feb 3, 2014
    1,398
    Lancashire
    How do you know it was him? Could it have been a burglar?
     
  7. Demonica66

    Demonica66 Registered User

    Oct 23, 2014
    55
    Hi FloC, it's not unusual for someone with Alzheimer's to suffer hallucinations. Could he have experienced a particularly vivid hallucination that caused him to react this way? Otherwise, he sounds quite vulnerable; as Lizzybean said, is it possible that he invited someone in, only for them to turn the place over, looking for valuables? Sadly, you might never know, but thank goodness he is ok. Hope you can get to the bottom of it. XX


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  8. FloC

    FloC Registered User

    Jul 21, 2015
    5
    Thank you and Lizzy Bean for your help. We're fairly sure that he did it himself as it was just the one room and his wallet was by the door and untouched. We keep trying to get him to keep his wallet out of sight but he just puts it back in the same place over again. Luckily there's not much in it. The hospital haven't found anything medically wrong with him. He does have hallucinations which involve seeing and talking to people who aren't there. Maybe he was trying to fight someone off. Who will ever know? Thanks again for your advice! xx
     
  9. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,436
    Yorkshire
    Not so extreme, but my dad regularly moved furniture around and 'tidied' the contents of cupboards so that they were left on surfaces, and usually did this at night when he was on his own. I'd go in ready to move things back quietly so he didn't know - as he rarely remembered what he'd done. It seemed to be something he did to calm his agitation, give him some control over his surroundings and have something to think about. A bit worrying as somehow he moved some heavy stuff all on his own, but he only ever gave himself a few bruises.
     
  10. devans

    devans Registered User

    Feb 9, 2014
    5
    Mum has done similar fighting off five people, this generally has been cured by the use of sleeping tablets. These are as an when and ensure at least twice a week she gets a deep sleep. This has totally changed her behaviour and hallucinations are reduced or removed with deep sleep as the brain is only refreshed when the hit the deep part might be worth a try

    David


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  11. devans

    devans Registered User

    Feb 9, 2014
    5
    Hi

    Mum has done similar fighting off five people, this generally has been cured by the use of sleeping tablets. These are as an when and ensure at least twice a week she gets a deep sleep. This has totally changed her behaviour and hallucinations are reduced or removed with deep sleep as the brain is only refreshed when the hit the deep part might be worth a try

    David



    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     

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