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Tooth removal

Zapped

Registered User
Oct 27, 2018
10
0
Hi, I’m here again,asking for experience and any advice. My mum has vascular dementia and is in care home
Mum has lost a tooth and has a loose tooth.
My sister has taken mum to dentist and they have advised removal of 2-3 teeth. Mum will need a new palate. Old one was lost and was loose anyway
Has anyone had experience of their loved one having teeth removed. How did they cope?
Were they able to manage getting the new palate fitting done? Did they wear it after?
My mum would never want to have her teeth removed so I am unsure whether to go ahead. Worried about the distress it would cause her but need to balance it with the worry of infection if we don’t.
Thank you
 

Jessbow

Registered User
Mar 1, 2013
4,231
0
Midlands
How old is she and do you think she is ableto comply with the dentist when it comes to the actul treatment.

Not sure I would have attepted it with my late mum
 

Zapped

Registered User
Oct 27, 2018
10
0
How old is she and do you think she is ableto comply with the dentist when it comes to the actul treatment.

Not sure I would have attepted it with my late mum
She is 82, she couldn’t have the X-ray done as she couldn’t bite down but that might have been the loose tooth, top front. It was hurting then but not now. I’m really not sure if she will let them. And would not want them to have to stop midway through!!! Dentist thinks there may be infection there.
They would not do her cataracts as they don’t think she would be still enough
 

Jessbow

Registered User
Mar 1, 2013
4,231
0
Midlands
If she cant bite down, I think they would struggle to make a new plate that fits. As a dnture wearer, I can tell you it isnt a nice feeling either, especially if the dentist overloads the bit plate with goo, It half chokes you!
 

Zapped

Registered User
Oct 27, 2018
10
0
If she cant bite down, I think they would struggle to make a new plate that fits. As a dnture wearer, I can tell you it isnt a nice feeling either, especially if the dentist overloads the bit plate with goo, It half chokes you!
Thank you. I may just say take the loose tooth out. And then see how we go from there
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,837
0
Victoria, Australia
My husband had a tooth removed a few months ago and at a later time he had a bridge fitted. He is 82 years old.

He has the loveliest dentist who takes the time to make sure the whole experience of his visits is really good. She talks to him all the time and reassures him, and calls me in if a decision has to be made.

He had no troubles during the extraction or getting the bridge fitted.

Interestingly, it is an all female practice but it surprising how many men are patients. And they are great with kids too.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
11,877
0
Southampton
if you think about it, females have looked after men all their lives from mothers, aunts, sisters, wives, daughters.so its not as surprising for the men to respond better to females
 

OnlyChild1

Registered User
Jan 19, 2018
34
0
North Yorkshire
Hi, just going through this with my Mum who is 86. The hardest bit is getting her to open her mouth, which she tends to clamp shut! Not helpful at all! Mum has partial dentures top and bottom and both are ill-fitting but she has 3 really loose teeth on the bottom and these need to come out and a new set of dentures sorted. We went for impressions the other day and it was hard work to get her to understand but the dentist managed to get impressions (in the end) - the gloopy stuff made her gag and I felt so awful putting her through it - it wasn't any fun for her. Now waiting to go back and have the bottom teeth extracted and the new dentures put in. Will see how that goes, not looking forward to it TBH. I've only persevered with it because she had toothache recently and everyone felt it was in her best interests but it is an awful chew (pardon the pun!).
 

Zapped

Registered User
Oct 27, 2018
10
0
My husband had a tooth removed a few months ago and at a later time he had a bridge fitted. He is 82 years old.

He has the loveliest dentist who takes the time to make sure the whole experience of his visits is really good. She talks to him all the time and reassures him, and calls me in if a decision has to be made.

He had no troubles during the extraction or getting the bridge fitted.

Interestingly, it is an all female practice but it surprising how many men are patients. And they are great with kids too.
My husband had a tooth removed a few months ago and at a later time he had a bridge fitted. He is 82 years old.

He has the loveliest dentist who takes the time to make sure the whole experience of his visits is really good. She talks to him all the time and reassures him, and calls me in if a decision has to be made.

He had no troubles during the extraction or getting the bridge fitted.

Interestingly, it is an all female practice but it surprising how many men are patients. And they are great with kids too.
Thank you, mums dentist is male but I think she may be better with that. I think one of us will have to be in with mum. Not sure how I will be watching a tooth removal!!another thing to consider 😂
 

Zapped

Registered User
Oct 27, 2018
10
0
Hi, just going through this with my Mum who is 86. The hardest bit is getting her to open her mouth, which she tends to clamp shut! Not helpful at all! Mum has partial dentures top and bottom and both are ill-fitting but she has 3 really loose teeth on the bottom and these need to come out and a new set of dentures sorted. We went for impressions the other day and it was hard work to get her to understand but the dentist managed to get impressions (in the end) - the gloopy stuff made her gag and I felt so awful putting her through it - it wasn't any fun for her. Now waiting to go back and have the bottom teeth extracted and the new dentures put in. Will see how that goes, not looking forward to it TBH. I've only persevered with it because she had toothache recently and everyone felt it was in her best interests but it is an awful chew (pardon the pun!).
Thank you. Sound s like you both have done really well so far. Did they do the impressions before the removal? The dentist mum is with has said they will have to wait a month after removal to do impressions. Mum is on and off food at moment and has lost a lot of weight. It could be the teeth causing it but don’t want her to end up worse as she will have no teeth on top. Appointment is in a couple of weeks so will see how she goes.
I think it will be difficult but then she will hopefully forget about it.
Hope your next appointments are ok.
 

OnlyChild1

Registered User
Jan 19, 2018
34
0
North Yorkshire
Thank you. Sound s like you both have done really well so far. Did they do the impressions before the removal? The dentist mum is with has said they will have to wait a month after removal to do impressions. Mum is on and off food at moment and has lost a lot of weight. It could be the teeth causing it but don’t want her to end up worse as she will have no teeth on top. Appointment is in a couple of weeks so will see how she goes.
I think it will be difficult but then she will hopefully forget about it.
Hope your next appointments are ok.
Hi, Mum's dentist took impressions (upper and lower) and will be doing the extractions when we next visit. At the same time, her new dentures will be ready and will be fitted the same day - seemed a bit strange to do extraction and fit on same day but that's where we are at! I am hoping Mum's teeth are so loose the extractions will go better than actually having the impressions taken. Fingers crossed. Sorry to hear your Mum has lost weight, you may find with a new set of dentures things improve, I do hope so. I must say, one benefit of dementia is the ability to also forget the not so nice stuff! Mum had to leave her old dentures with the dentist whilst her new ones arrive later this week. I was worried about her not eating but the home tell me she is doing ok and managing fine, certainly, when we popped in the other day, she was happily eating a big slice of chocolate cake!
Good luck with your appointments.
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,837
0
Victoria, Australia
Immediate dentures are very painful for a while after the extractions and insertion, You will also have to go back for adjustments as your mum’s mouth settles. I suspect that mum is not going to be happy for a while,

My son in law had these and was never happy with them as they rubbed a lot and never seemed to get a good fit. He finally ditched them and got a whole new set done which cut much better.
 

OnlyChild1

Registered User
Jan 19, 2018
34
0
North Yorkshire
Immediate dentures are very painful for a while after the extractions and insertion, You will also have to go back for adjustments as your mum’s mouth settles. I suspect that mum is not going to be happy for a while,

My son in law had these and was never happy with them as they rubbed a lot and never seemed to get a good fit. He finally ditched them and got a whole new set done which cut much better.
Yes, I think they will be, almost goes without saying doesn't it after having extractions too? I suspect Mum will 'manage' without wearing them in the end :( She is not good communicating now, everyone will just have to assume she is in pain/uncomfortable and we will try persevere until things might naturally have settled or have been tweeked by adjustments.

I will steel myself for regular visits to the dentist to get them sorted satisfactorily though the impressions were difficult to get, and I doubt optimum, so I imagine things might be doomed to fail right from the start!:rolleyes:
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
11,877
0
Southampton
im not sure i would have dentures straight after having a tooth out. having a tooth out is sore enough so having false tooth on the same spot could be painful and lead to infection if not kept clean properly. the front ones are the worst in my opinion and i had most of them out.
 

OnlyChild1

Registered User
Jan 19, 2018
34
0
North Yorkshire
I don't disagree. I was thinking of asking the home to encourage strict mouth hygiene until the gums have healed and then introduce the dentures. An infection would be a nightmare.
 

Moggymad

Registered User
May 12, 2017
985
0
Reading this reminds me of my mums fear of the dentist. I can only ever remember her going for herself once in my life when she had toothache & needed extraction. She never had a single filling due to her fear.
Over time her teeth loosened & fell out until all that was renaining at the front was one at the bottom & one at the top! She struggled to bite & turned her mouth sideways to do so but somehow she managed. Mum did lose a lot of weight in the care home but i didn’t think it was due to her teeth, more her dementia decline.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
11,877
0
Southampton
my husband has no teeth or dentures due to them being kicked out when he was a lot younger. the dentures hurt on the scar tissue. its not affected him much, still can eat steak, roast potatoes etc. the only thing he cant eat is nuts but he crushes them with a rolling pin. with apples, he slices them with a knife as cant bite into them.