Too excited

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,012
Scotland
Hi

Husband has Alzheimer's. He gets very too excited about things, what can I do?

Reds
Excited - enthusiastic

Excited - agitated

Excited - aggressive

You will have to give us a bit more information as there is no knowing here what the problem is.
 

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Ok thanks marionq.

He laughs at things that are not funny, if we go out in the car he does a lot of cheering, hoorays, cries about things, gets excited about one biscuit with hoorays and cheering and all the time!! Know there is worse behaviour but it can be too much! Sings the same thing over and over again such as wanting a biscuit.

Reds
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,012
Scotland
By itself none of that is too worrying. The best thing to do is keep a diary and note any odd behaviour, memory loss, inability to do things he could do before, losing things, losing himself etc

Once you have a list of things that are concerning go to his GP and ask if they will do a general health check and at the same time do a dementia check without openly calling it that.

Most GPs will understand.
 

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Thank you! It is very hard when all the time, every day. Cheering, hoorays, laughing, crying, yeehas its hard to emphasize, its loud and excitable and can happen anywhere and with anyone. Its too much!
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,342
South coast
This is called emotional lability due to Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA)
I note your husband has been diagnosed with Alzheimers. See if your GP will refer him to the Community Psychiatric Team - I believe that there is medication that can calm it down.
 

Bunpoots

Volunteer Host
Apr 1, 2016
3,810
Nottinghamshire
Hi @Reds. I’m no medical expert but I believe what your husband is experiencing is called “emotional lability”. I did a quick google search and it’s also sometimes referred to as “emotional incontinence”. My dad had episodes of this occasionally, although not as extreme as your husband sounds.

I won’t carry on as @canary beat me to it...:)

But my dad was prescribed a low dose of sodium valproate by his consultant to help level his mood.
 

Duggies-girl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2017
1,787
Thank you! It is very hard when all the time, every day. Cheering, hoorays, laughing, crying, yeehas its hard to emphasize, its loud and excitable and can happen anywhere and with anyone. Its too much!
I would find that very hard too @Reds Dad sings constantly, nothing recognisable just bom de bom bom all the time and it drives me nuts sometimes. I have no answers for you but I do feel for you.
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
1,290
North West
Mum sings and hums Lord of the Dance when she gets happily excited, very often hear her singing it in her bedroom before bed or when she's pottering and causing chaos putting everything in the wrong place -which she is currently doing as I write
 

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Just want to say thanks again to bunpoots and canary. Have never heard of this before and me and my husband have had to cope with this for years! He is on medication for before behaviour tho. I will definitely speak to his specialist. I use lots of coping strategies to cope with the bahaviour for his sake and mine. Has been very difficult. I now feel like saying 'hooray' for at last knowing what it is!! Plus at the same time feeling upset that its taken all this time to know! On reading the website info I see that I have been doing the right thing by avoiding triggers, not laughing when he does when things are not funny, giving him space etc. Sometimes even thought he was doing it on purpose! Now I know not! It has been a nightmare!

Reds
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,012
Scotland
I’m so Impressed too that we’ve learned something new yet again on TP. What a wealth of wisdom and knowledge!