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Today is .........

Mibs

Registered User
May 26, 2014
73
Derbyshire
the first time I've found my husband's boxer shorts (used) hung up neatly on a clothes hanger with the shirts in his wardrobe!
 

AlsoConfused

Registered User
Sep 17, 2010
1,953
This disease is the death of a thousand cuts with a vengeance. Every "cut", however miniscule, hurts ...

Would it help any if you told yourself that hanging up the shorts neatly was a sign of your husband's continuing desire for order and a sign of his brave determination to fight the disorder of the disease as best he can?

Mum used to break my heart at the beginning of her illness by grimly reading the daily 'paper to keep her mind alive. Her instincts were right I feel. Her decline's been comparatively slow.
 

WIFE

Registered User
May 23, 2014
856
WEST SUSSEX
Mibs dear - just try to laugh rather than cry. Your thread has brought back memories of many strange things my husband did during his epic struggle against dementia and thankfully now I can laugh a little but at the time I struggled to understand why radios would be hidden in biscuit tins full of cold coffee - the batteries having been put down the loo for safe keeping! Thinking of you WIFE
 

Mibs

Registered User
May 26, 2014
73
Derbyshire
Thanks for your support - it did make me smile. It's not the worst thing that could happen, he's pretty inventive, but not yet progressed to drowning radios - we're at the making coffee with cold water stage.
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
12,896
England
My husband made two pork chops and a pack of butter dissapear. I found them a week later on top of the central heating boiler, the chops cooked and the butter melted and all over the bottom of the boiler cupboard. He had obviously decided that was the best place to defrost and of course forgotten where they were and denying ever seeing them.

He spent many hours in the garage doing 'things' not sure what but it kept him ocupied and fairly happy. When I cleared the garage which had become a hoarders paradise I found thousands and thousands of screws split into sets of 6 and each set made into a parcel by winding feet of insulating tape round each 6. He had sized them too. I lost the will to live trying to remove the tape so 90% were dumped with all the unnecessary rubbish he had kept. I can smile now at his antics but at the time, dealing with everything else that dementia throws at us I found it far from amusing.
 

kenaidog

Registered User
Apr 8, 2013
164
I think you have to laugh at some of it, if you dont it will just wear you down. Its like having a kid again and they do crazy things.
 

Badietta

Registered User
Feb 23, 2013
88
Thanks you Mibs. Best laugh I've had all day.

Why do they do this stuff? I've absolutely no idea but I get at least one of these a day now - and what I can't do is burst into fits of laughter (even though I want to) in front of him. He's now watching the News (can only do 'soundbites' these days) so I'm just so grateful to you for sharing this.

Badietta
 

kenaidog

Registered User
Apr 8, 2013
164
I was giving my mother some cake the other day and she picked it up and wiped her runny nose with the cake, so so weird. I dont get how she doesnt know what the different things are infront of her. I hold food up to her lips and touch her lip with it and most of the time there is just nothing. Part of the disease i know, senses fade and they just dont recongnise anything anymore.