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Tips On Giving PWD Their Medication

Sparx

Registered User
Mar 22, 2020
20
Have any of you kind people on this Forum any tips on giving Medication to People with Dementia ?

My elderly Mother takes Medication Three times a Day and is sometimes reluctant to accept what is Prescribed by her GP.

I can sympathise with her dislike of taking Pills as some are quite large and the quantity prescribed would make me reluctant to take them.

Whilst administering her Medication I try to select the smaller sized pills in small groups of Three using a Tea Spoon..then work my way up to the larger sizes ending in singular items of her Medication.

I try to take my time giving my Mother these Pills and also encourage her by giving her Water or her favourite Barley Water to drink during each Tea Spoon.

Sometimes my Sister helps and told me she recognises some of Mums Medication as she is prescribed the same product...one of which my Sister said “ that round dark coloured Pill fizzes in my mouth and tastes like Chalk “. .....so now I make sure that Pill is last on the list for Mum to take.

I have tried to research reluctance of People taking Medication and i found that some products also come in liquid form but due to Coronavirus and Doctors being extremely busy that would probably not be an option open to me right now.
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
1,789
Have you tried placing the tablets in a spoonful of something like yoghurt, ice cream, custard, jelly etc? I found that giving Mum her tablet with something sweet made it easier for her to swallow it. Some tablets can be crushed up but you would need to check as this does not apply to all.
 

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
274
Newtown, Wales
I find with my wife (PWD) there are certain times of the day when she will take the medication without too much hassle, all other times is a complete no no.
 

Sparx

Registered User
Mar 22, 2020
20
All of those food items that you mention @Louise7 are favourites of Mum but she can at times be quite confused and has in the past wrongly accused Staff at her C/Home of her trying to poison her.
Mum looks very closely at what’s given to her and I get numerous comments and questions when she sees what’s on the Tea Spoon.
As she takes around Twelve Tablets in the Morning , Nine in the Afternoon and finally Three at Night I need to be certain that all the Medication has been taken.
This has resulted in me giving her One Tea Spoon and visually checking that they are being swallowed before giving the next Spoon.
If I give her One Spoon then a drink then get distracted by something Mum will remove the Tablets and put them on her table or hide them in Tissues.
Maybe I will try the Yogurt deception with the Fizzy Chalk tasting one my Sister says tastes horrible.
Thanks for your suggestion.
 

Sparx

Registered User
Mar 22, 2020
20
I have the same problem @Alex54 ...for me I just try to return when Mum is more compliant but that sometimes can make problems if it overlaps the next designated time Medication is due to be given.
If that happens I try to postpone the next designated time for Four Hours or so.
I found making notes on when it was administered is best way of keeping on top of this.
 

RosettaT

Registered User
Sep 9, 2018
436
Mid Lincs
No point in trying to hide my OH's tablets in anything smooth, as soon as he feels them he will either spit them out or chew them.
He now has liquid paracetamol, memantine, and antibiotics. His risperidone is very small so not usually a problem but the capsule for his prostrate can be. It's a time release but he often chews it, he ok taking it if he' s really bright.
I would enquire about liquid alternatives when you order her next prescription.
 
Last edited:

Sparx

Registered User
Mar 22, 2020
20
No point in trying to hide my OH's tablets in anything smooth, as soon as he feels them he will either spit them out or chew them.
He now has liquid paracetamol, memantine, and antibiotics. His risperidone is very small so not usually a problem but the capsule for his prostrate can be. It's a time release but he often chews it, he ok taking it if he' s really bright.
I would enquire about liquid alternatives when you order her next prescription.
I think my Mother would probably do the same and spit them out too @rosetta T
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
8,794
Yorkshire
Hi @Sparx
When dad became awkward about meds I checked with his GP/consultant which pills were essential, which could be dispensed with, which could be given in liquid form, which could skip one time and be either given later or just set aside, which might be ground up or chewed
Then I had an idea of which to give first, in case he refused later ones, and which he could miss out if need be
The consultant made it clear that battling to get him to take meds if he was vehement he wouldn't was counter productive for us both...
So I would offer them once, calmly, try again once then leave it for some minutes, taking pills and water out of sight, and bring them back as though it was the first time... often this worked, not always... I did wonder if he needed time to accept the pills: as with many with dementia, his default response was mostly NO.. maybe he wanted to feel a little in control
I also hid some pills, in yogurt or between two small pieces of his favourite biscuit... and sometimes warmed the water, i personally don't like cold drinks so take any pills with something luke warm, not always water
 

Sparx

Registered User
Mar 22, 2020
20
I think you made some very helpful points in your reply @Shedrech thank you.

I did think of trying to contact Mums GP to find out which meds were a priority but have been quite busy today rearranging furniture ready for a Mediquip visit tomorrow of a Hospital type adjustable Bed and Air Pump Mattress..

Im also hoping Mums GP will at some stage be able to spare some time to discuss organising a District Nurse to visit to fully assess Mums needs now.

Mums mobility has declined considerably in the Two Years she has resided in a C/Home and its takes it toll on her moving her from her Recliner Chair then to Bed.

I spoke to a Local District Nurse yesterday to try to arrange a visit but appeared snowed under with her workload and advised me to contact Mums GP first.

When Mum lived with me Two Years ago she was able to use the Stairlift and get around with a wheeled Zimmer Frame but that’s not possible now.

At the moment Mum is in good health regarding this awful Virus and is happy to be home which in turn makes me smile again.
 

Sparx

Registered User
Mar 22, 2020
20
Mums bed arrived yesterday thanks to the kind help from Mediquip.
The bed was assembled on site by an Engineer called Luke 👍and after a quick run through on basic operations of bed and air pump mattress all was complete within an hour.
Mum seemed very comfortable when I put her to bed later that evening and I was able to make adjustments to the bed to suit her needs.
A Social Worker contacted me this morning enquiring if everything was satisfactory with the bed and we discussed other possible items that may benefit Mums well-being.
Despite all the uncertainty with Coronavirus and limitations about what can done in this difficult period there are some excellent people working in our Care system.
 

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