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Time to allow visitors into care homes?

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
1,858
North West
@Palerider you'll see from the link I posted in your other thread that there is now a 'plan' in place but it is only a short term one with no details of any longer term solutions, such as weekly testing of staff/residents which is happening in other countries.
Thanks -I posted and then read your response -lol. At least its one step closer to a solution, pity its not several.
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,280
At least its one step closer to a solution, pity its not several.
Yes, and on the plus side I'm pleased to see from the plan that my nanny and cleaner can return to work and I can go back to the tennis and golf clubs :rolleyes:
 

Trebor64

New member
Jan 28, 2020
6
My mum went into a care home just two weeks ago following a stay in hospital. She has not yet experienced normal life in there, she was supposed to spend two weeks in her room but would not comply so they had to give up. I think she is even more unsettled than she might have been as on the one time we have spoken to her on the phone she cried because she didn't know where she was and she was angry that we were not visiting her.

But, even though there are currently no cases of Covid 19 in the home or among staff, I am in two minds about allowing visitors too soon. I'd love to pop in and see mum again but I would not want any residents to be exposed to the virus. I guess it's a waiting game.

We have not even been to the home to choose it, only dropped things off at the door, we have not met the staff, had a tour, gone through a care plan, sorted out contracts etc other than in limited phone calls. So I would be happy just to have a meeting with the manager to find out more about how the home is run.
My mum went into a care home just two weeks ago following a stay in hospital. She has not yet experienced normal life in there, she was supposed to spend two weeks in her room but would not comply so they had to give up. I think she is even more unsettled than she might have been as on the one time we have spoken to her on the phone she cried because she didn't know where she was and she was angry that we were not visiting her.

But, even though there are currently no cases of Covid 19 in the home or among staff, I am in two minds about allowing visitors too soon. I'd love to pop in and see mum again but I would not want any residents to be exposed to the virus. I guess it's a waiting game.

We have not even been to the home to choose it, only dropped things off at the door, we have not met the staff, had a tour, gone through a care plan, sorted out contracts etc other than in limited phone calls. So I would be happy just to have a meeting with the manager to find out more about how the home is run.
Snap.. It was 7 weeks ago when my partner was admitted from hospital.
Did a video chat last week.
Tears rolling down my partners face, not knowing why or where she is, confused that no one sees her, accompanied by 2 Carers with masks etc ( which I I know is needed), but only made her more anxious.
She’s aged, looks awful, but I keep getting told she’s happy.
Who I’m I to believe ?
Awful situation for us all to be in, but worst for our loved ones in a Care Home etc, as they do not know what’s happening.
No answers, but concerns about the effect of not seeing loved ones on those living with Dementia.
Despite the best efforts of Carers etc, it’s not the same.
Fingers crossed is about the best I can come up with.
Thinking of you.
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
1,858
North West
A thought provoking article in the Scotsman today about the need to balance risk and protection to try to find a way to allow care home residents, particularly with dementia, to have family visits:

https://www.scotsman.com/news/polit...ronavirus-could-cure-be-worse-disease-2855762
It certainly raises many questions around visiting. I'm not sure a perspex room is required though as outlined in Northern Ireland. I think PPE and distancing is still the better option. But there is a new problem, reported yesterday in The Guardian of a new surge of Coveid-19 in London care homes, and its uncertain why:

 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,280
But there is a new problem, reported yesterday in The Guardian of a new surge of Coveid-19 in London care homes, and its uncertain why
It seems that it was the mass testing of residents that uncovered the 'possible new cases'. The first home thought, presumably due to no-one displaying symptoms in the last 2 weeks, that the virus had gone. The other home think that it may be a new outbreak, and may have been introduced via someone who had been discharged from hospital, but again it seems that it was the testing that identified that the virus was in the home rather than the symptoms that were being displayed.

As I posted elsewhere yesterday, there is evidence to show that the elderly can display 'atypical' covid-19 symptoms, others may be asymptomatic, so it could be a case of rather than a new outbreak of the virus it is the same outbreak that hadn't gone away but the lack of typical covid-19 symptoms led the care homes to think that it had. Difficult to know without the full facts but the article demonstrates just how important, and effective, mass testing of care home residents & staff is. Hopefully a programme will be put into place to ensure that such testing takes place regularly - in other countries they conduct tests in care home weekly or twice weekly - as a one-off mass testing is not going to be sufficient to protect care home staff and residents and prevent the spread.
 

Baker17

Registered User
Mar 9, 2016
646
It seems that it was the mass testing of residents that uncovered the 'possible new cases'. The first home thought, presumably due to no-one displaying symptoms in the last 2 weeks, that the virus had gone. The other home think that it may be a new outbreak, and may have been introduced via someone who had been discharged from hospital, but again it seems that it was the testing that identified that the virus was in the home rather than the symptoms that were being displayed.

As I posted elsewhere yesterday, there is evidence to show that the elderly can display 'atypical' covid-19 symptoms, others may be asymptomatic, so it could be a case of rather than a new outbreak of the virus it is the same outbreak that hadn't gone away but the lack of typical covid-19 symptoms led the care homes to think that it had. Difficult to know without the full facts but the article demonstrates just how important, and effective, mass testing of care home residents & staff is. Hopefully a programme will be put into place to ensure that such testing takes place regularly - in other countries they conduct tests in care home weekly or twice weekly - as a one-off mass testing is not going to be sufficient to protect care home staff and residents and prevent the spread.
They tried to test my husband last week, he has Alzheimer’s but he wouldn’t cooperate and got very agitated and threatened to staff and the tester so they had to back off. I had suspected this might happen as he is cooperating with personal care. I think this will be a problem in trying to get all residents tested.
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
1,858
North West
It seems that it was the mass testing of residents that uncovered the 'possible new cases'. The first home thought, presumably due to no-one displaying symptoms in the last 2 weeks, that the virus had gone. The other home think that it may be a new outbreak, and may have been introduced via someone who had been discharged from hospital, but again it seems that it was the testing that identified that the virus was in the home rather than the symptoms that were being displayed.

As I posted elsewhere yesterday, there is evidence to show that the elderly can display 'atypical' covid-19 symptoms, others may be asymptomatic, so it could be a case of rather than a new outbreak of the virus it is the same outbreak that hadn't gone away but the lack of typical covid-19 symptoms led the care homes to think that it had. Difficult to know without the full facts but the article demonstrates just how important, and effective, mass testing of care home residents & staff is. Hopefully a programme will be put into place to ensure that such testing takes place regularly - in other countries they conduct tests in care home weekly or twice weekly - as a one-off mass testing is not going to be sufficient to protect care home staff and residents and prevent the spread.
Absolutely!
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,280
A glimmer of good news for those in Scotland. The Scotland covid-19 'route map' which was published today makes reference to care homes and a phased resumption of family visits within 'phase 3'. Although there's no specific time frame at least the situation has been considered, unlike the covid-19 'Plan' for England which makes no reference to any easing of care home visiting restrictions:

Necessary changes to the care home sector such as restricted visiting and a pause on normal activities and routines in order to protect residents, staff and visitors is having a significant impact on the wellbeing of residents and their loved ones. Care homes are first and foremost people's homes and it is important that we find safe ways for people to reconnect with their families and friends.

Phase 3 - There will be a phased resumption of visiting to care homes by family members in a managed way.

https://www.gov.scot/publications/c...otlands-route-map-through-out-crisis/pages/4/
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
1,858
North West
A glimmer of good news for those in Scotland. The Scotland covid-19 'route map' which was published today makes reference to care homes and a phased resumption of family visits within 'phase 3'. Although there's no specific time frame at least the situation has been considered, unlike the covid-19 'Plan' for England which makes no reference to any easing of care home visiting restrictions:

Necessary changes to the care home sector such as restricted visiting and a pause on normal activities and routines in order to protect residents, staff and visitors is having a significant impact on the wellbeing of residents and their loved ones. Care homes are first and foremost people's homes and it is important that we find safe ways for people to reconnect with their families and friends.

Phase 3 - There will be a phased resumption of visiting to care homes by family members in a managed way.

https://www.gov.scot/publications/c...otlands-route-map-through-out-crisis/pages/4/
I glimpsed at this yesterday, good news for those in Scotland. There will have to be move at some point and good to see that this is being addressed. Might email a copy to my MP 🧐
 

Helly68

Registered User
Mar 12, 2018
670
Just had a round-robin email from our care home group. They are introducing some limited, pre-booked visitor sessions outside in the garden. PPE must be worn and distancing maintained.
Whilst I welcome this, I really wonder how it may work for my Mum, late stage mixed dementia, cannot transfer and as far as I know hasn't been outside in a while.
I would love to see her but moving her in a wheelchair (which they do to transfer) is a bit awkward as she doesn't co-operate, for instance dragging her feet on the floor risking a twisted ankle as she won't use wheelchair foot plates. To be fair her legs are very long so wheelchairs arent all that comfy for her. I think she will also find it cold outside as the care home is always tropical.

Mummy is also a great hugger, she is not going to understand that due to the distancing rules I can't hug her.

I wonder, though I really have missed her, if this will just make her more agitated. I also wonder, since the email was "generic" whether they would even advise it for late stage dementia (the home also has residential). Hmmmm will have to ring them next week and see what they think.
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,280
@Helly68 My mum's home is just about to start visits in the garden, but only for those residents who will be able to manage this - it's a nursing home and the residents are at various stages. It's a difficult one, but I think speaking to the staff to see how they feel your mum would cope with going outside is probably the best thing to do.
 

Helly68

Registered User
Mar 12, 2018
670
Thank you @Louise7 I think that is what I will do.
I am trying to put aside what I feel, which is hard and think about what might be best for Mummy. I am also really worried about how much she may have declined.
 

Sarasa

Registered User
Apr 13, 2018
1,539
I had a generic letter from the CEO of the care home group that mum's in. They are working towards sorting out something for visiting, maybe timed slots. They've been hit hard with over 600 deaths across their homes, but at least 800 residents have recovered.
I'll give it a week and then if I've not heard anything direct from the home phone up and see what's happening.
 

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