1. jack172

    jack172 Registered User

    Nov 3, 2015
    1
    #1 jack172, Nov 3, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2015
    Hi all,
    My gran was absolutely fine on Saturday evening, then I went round at lunchtime on Sunday to take her out and found her ill in bed with potential signs of a stroke. I got her to hospital and it was thought to be a TIA- she had a CT which came back clear and the effects haven't cleared up. She seems to think it's 1937 as that's her answer as to what year it is (it was 1957 on Sunday). She was initially transferred to a medical ward but today she is going to a mental health ward.
    Does anyone have any idea if this could be related to dementia with an extremely rapid onset?
    Also, a UTI was found in the urinalysis however she isn't being treated for that.

    Thanks all,

    Jack
     
  2. Goldsmith

    Goldsmith Registered User

    Oct 21, 2015
    18
    Maldon, Essex
    My dad did not have dementia but was on dialysis and often he would become very confused if he had a urinary infection, however, this would clear up once he was clear of the infection. More recently - approx. 4 months - my father in law was hospitalised with a kidney infection which really knocked him for six. Previously still looking after himself at the age of 98 he suddenly became extremely confused and was recently diagnosed with vascular dementia, he is now living with us and needs 24 hour care as he can no longer do anything for himself. His decline has been rapid and its heartbreaking to see this very proud and independent man struggling to comprehend what has happened to him.
     
  3. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,487
    Female
    London
    What do you mean she is not being treated for the UTI? She needs antibiotics ASAP!
     
  4. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,328
    Female
    South coast
    UTIs have really bad effects on elderly people and can lead to extreme confusion and delirium. If shes got a UTI it needs treating.
     
  5. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,740
    Hi Jack
    A UTI often mimics dementia and can cause quite severe symptoms. Sometimes people are totally confused and disoriented and sometimes hallucinatory. Without knowing more detail it is hard to tell but I would definitely be questioning why they are not treating the UTI!!!
    Good luck
     
  6. Mrsbusy

    Mrsbusy Registered User

    Aug 15, 2015
    356
    My mum had this happen t her. She had a stroke and TIAs and the hospital left her UTI untreated. This did permanent damage to the brain as it was left for days and she was hallucinating etc in the ward. Please get the UTI sorted out very quickly, no matter how much you have to pester them! It has very bad repercussions left untreated on the brain, so the more you can get it sorted the better she will recover from her stroke.
     
  7. henfenywfach

    henfenywfach Registered User

    May 23, 2013
    333
    rct
    Hi!

    Seems that you had the same experience as myself.
    I'm my dad's carer he has dementia and has had suspected tias in the past.
    Last weekend taken to a&e with suspected stroke.
    Ct scan clear ..no bleed!
    Kept in and then sent home next day. Symptoms stayed. He was recovering a chest infection and on antibiotics. It seems that infection can leave a person with dementia progressed or more unwell than they were before. Why that has happened one can only assume that it's related to the affect on the brain of the dementia.
    Antibiotics are important. .as infections like chest urine etc can affect appetite and hydration.

    Just because a person has dementia doesn't mean they don't get other illnesses!!

    Best wishes
     

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