They want to send her home!

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by camkam, Jan 3, 2016.

  1. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    #1 camkam, Jan 3, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2016
    Mum is 92 and has just been diagnosed with Alzheimers (we waited four months for this diagnosis from the initial assessment!). She's currently in a care home on short term assessment which as been extended twice because of her fluctuating behaviour. Social Services have been to see her three times to assess whether or not she has mental capacity and each time she has presented herself well and has been quite lucid, so they are talking about sending her home. I am objecting to this as there are more often days when she doesn't know where she is, she is mentally back in her childhood worried about missing school, being late home etc., and there is no pacifying her, she gets very agitated and sometimes aggressive in her illusions. We will be asked to attend a Best Interests meeting shortly and in the meantime the care home have been asked to report on mum's "bad days" which happen more frequently than the good, but there is no way she could go home and live alone as she wanders all night long during her bad periods and there is no consoling her. Does anyone have any advice as to how I can deal with Social Services and try to persuade them that they could be making a mistake based on three one-hour meetings with a lady whose behaviour is erratic at best? I'm very worried because this is the fifth social worker Mum has had since September and they have a serious lack of continuity in passing information on to the predecessor. She has a depravation of liberty order which was taken out by the last social worker but this current one seems hellbent on sending her home.
     
  2. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,731
    I would suggest that you tell them that she wanders all night long xxx times a week and is very distressed and this behaviour makes her vulnerable and at risk and you have serious concerns for her safety. Get it on record and they should not be putting her in a position where she is not safe. They won't put in night sitters and this is often the trigger that makes the difference between home and residential. Others will have other ideas too. Thinking of you, stay strong and try to stay calm and you will get through this to a good outcome.
     
  3. min88cat

    min88cat Registered User

    Apr 6, 2010
    581
    Just a quick question, is your mum self funding or LA funded?
     
  4. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    Hi, she's LA funded, and I feel that this is all money-oriented.
     
  5. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    Thank you, I appreciate your comments, the care home are recording all of her 'episodes' and these are all reminiscent of her behaviour before she had a fall which is why she ended up in hospital and subsequently the care home. I'll make sure that everything is on record.
     
  6. rageineden

    rageineden Registered User

    Dec 14, 2015
    20
    #6 rageineden, Jan 4, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2016
    Do you have a lasting power of attorney for her health/welfare?

    If you can get this in place do it straight away as in the long term it will stop some of what the bureaucrats try to do. It does take a few months to arrange but it does need to be done. See office of public guardian website for details of what you need to do.

    Before they can send her home the social workers must have a suitable care package in place to keep the person safe at home. They will do everything possible to keep this to a minimum but you have to be persistent!If nothing else use it as a delaying tactic while you sort out the power of attorney stuff.

    Even if you agree to this it can take weeks and weeks to put in place as they cannot find suitable staff/agencies quickly.The best interest meeting should include everyone connected with the daily care of your mother, otherwise a complete care package cannot be put in place.

    You should contact the council adult safeguarding team straight away and inform them of what is going on. Do this by phone and email so you have something written down. Tell them it is a safeguarding issue, don't let them put you off by referring you back to the social worker.

    Call and email the social worker detailing you consider this to be a safeguarding issue. That way it will slow them down as you used the safeguarding 'buzz' word.
    Tell the duty social worker (as you never get the same person twice!) to log on the call record it is a safeguarding issue. They might tell you that in their professional opinion it isn't, just ignore that and insist it is logged.

    You are right it is totally about the money! I have never met a group of people who are so focused on budgets nothing else counts. ( i run a huge business and can't get my managers to think like that...unfortunately). If you are not self funding you will find they want to send her home as it is the cheaper option, but don't let them put you off just keep at them!

    Take deep breaths and fight for what you want to happen and don't be afraid of kicking up a fuss as unfortunately this is the only way to get things happening as you want them to.

    Hope that helps a little.
     
  7. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    #7 camkam, Jan 4, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2016
    Hi, thank you for your advice, I do have PoA health & welfare but I understood that this only kicks in once mum has been deemed to not have mental capacity and I'm not sure who makes this decision. I have told the social worker about this and it did seem to make her stop and think as did my comments regarding mum's erratic behaviour when she lived at home prior to being admitted to the hospital and subsequently the care home. I can't understand why each time a new social worker takes on mum's case, it's me who has to bring them up to date with 'the story so far'. If they were a business in the private sector they would never survive. I am going to fight tooth and nail to get the decision that I want, even if it means going to the local newspaper and publicising the problem.
     
  8. rageineden

    rageineden Registered User

    Dec 14, 2015
    20
    We have had the power of attorney in place for about 9 months. Even so social workers etc do still try and by pass this and say when they spoke to our relative he had capacity at that point in time. We always challenge this forcefully in writing and it gets them to back off.

    Make sure you email the social workers a copy of the power of attorney certificate and the care home then no one has the excuse of 'we have nothing on file'.

    It would be worth asking a hospital consultant and/or GP to reassess your mothers mental capacity due to her recent behavior.I don't know the details but from what you say i think the consultant would look at things positively for you.

    Power of attorney and 'safeguarding' normally stop most of the nonsense.

    We found by accident that making official complaints is a good tactic. This is because they (local authorities) are scored negatively internally on this in a similar way to the NHS.

    Communication is zero between social workers. They don't talk to each other even when you find out they sit opposite to each other. However this is also used to deflect you as the best form of defense is ignorance. That's why we insist on everything in writing. We also copy anyone we can think of on emails so no one can say they were not aware.
     
  9. Livveywills

    Livveywills Registered User

    Jul 11, 2015
    57
    I have POA - if it has been registered then it has kicked in, doesn't mean that they won't take your mums wishes into account but it does mean that you are a powerful voice speaking in her interests.

    I would emphasis how little care you are able to provide - ensuring that if they do insist she comes home that a full care package has to be provided by her - itemise the things that would be needed - eg night supervision or at least an on call person should they suggest a door alarm. someone to dress, cook, clean shop laundry. Think about any hazards that you can for the home and list those and reasons why they would need to provide extra care.

    I'm not saying that you wouldn't provide any care yourself but that you shouldn't let social services know it might be an option - nothing they like better than free carers
     
  10. Onlyme

    Onlyme Registered User

    Apr 5, 2010
    4,995
    UK
    I think the hot phrases are DUTY OF CARE, AT RISK and DUTY OF CARE.

    Tell them she us not safe at home and if anything happens to her you will hold them personally accountable and ask them to minute that in the meeting notes.
     
  11. tigerlady

    tigerlady Registered User

    Nov 29, 2015
    427
    " She has a depravation of liberty order which was taken out by the last social worker but this current one seems hellbent on sending her home."

    You stated that in your first post. If that is still in force they cannot simply send her home. Someone from the DoLS team should reassess her when it runs out. One of the reasons the DoLS is given is that the person is assessed not to have the capacity to make decisions in their best interests. Contact the DoLS team - I find that they are more accessible than social workers, who never seem to be in the office or else you are handed over to a different one
     
  12. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    Thank you, my husband has said that when we attend the meeting he will ask all the social workers for their details and he will state all three points that you mention above.
     
  13. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    Hi, I'm starting to note down all the things that happened whilst she was at home previously, so I will have quite a dossier by the time we go to the best interests meeting. I actually live 200 miles away so I can't provide any care at that distance so there would definitely have to be a full care package but the social worker has already told me that they cannot provide night care so maybe that will go in our favour.
     
  14. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    Yes I did think about contacting the DoLS team to see what the situation is, I'll do that tomorrow, thank you.
     
  15. Sterling

    Sterling Registered User

    Jun 20, 2013
    69
    I have been following this post with interest! My mum is still in hospital and desperate to go home. SS are offering carers 3 x a day plus a night sitter but my mum has no capacity and I am sure that it will result in a failed discharge. I have rung the DOLS team and a very helpful lady said they would follow my mum's case. We are waiting for a date for the Best Interest meeting. SS have appointed an Advocate and I have now applied for Deputyship. I hope that you get the outcome that you want!!
     
  16. rageineden

    rageineden Registered User

    Dec 14, 2015
    20
    There is not such thing as can't/don't!

    Social services told us under no circumstances would they provide night care...tonight our relative is home for the first time in six months with night care provided at home supplied and paid for by social services.

    The system as i have said before is designed to put you off so that you give up due to the emotional stress you are inevitably under.

    Unfortunately it is a system of who shouts loudest/makes the most fuss gets a result. Take full notes at your meeting, get everyone's email details so that you can confirm everything to everyone. Don't be afraid to stand your ground, you don't need to be rude/aggressive, you just need to be direct and question everything you are told.

    I'm not saying we have got all we wanted or that we still don't have a massive fight ahead of us....but you can get what you and your relative need (in the end). Good luck!
     
  17. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    Hi, well a lot has happened since my last post. Yesterday Social Services emailed me to say they had assessed mum again and she did have the capacity to make a decision and she wants to go home so they have decided to send her home with 'intensive support' and a care worker will stay awake for one night with her to see her night-time behaviour. I've replied to the email stating my objections and concerns (three A4 pages in total!) so it's all in writing, I can do no more so I'll just have to go with the flow. I can't provide any support for mum as I live too far away and I found out that the Depravation of Liberty is still in a 'to do' pile at the DoL office so that isn't going to happen now. Apparently mum told the social worker that if she feels she isn't safe at home she's happy to go back to the care home! How gullible can anyone be? The social worker actually believes her!
     
  18. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,731
    I am so surprised that this has happened given that you documented everything and were so clear about the issues. Your mum must be a very strong lady and very lucid on occasions . Did the care home support your view or your mum's?
    Anyway you are right, you will just have to let this run its course now but you must be worried, keep posting, thinking of you
     
  19. camkam

    camkam Registered User

    Jul 20, 2015
    62
    My mum is very strong-willed and stubborn, and she has told one of her visitors that she knows when the social worker visits that she must give 'the right answers'. How on earth she knows this when the next minute she doesn't know where she is I don't know but that's what happens. The care home have sent emails to the social workers (blind copied to me) detailing her bad episodes when she thinks she's a teenager who has to ring her dad to let him know she'll be home late or to ask her husband (my dad, deceased) to collect her from the coast as she's missed the bus home. All this apparently doesn't count because social services can only go on what they actually see. I haven't heard anything from them since my long and detailed reply to their email so I'm hoping it's given them food for thought. I told them I would be holding them personally responsible for any consequences arising from the decision they made to send mum home from the safety of the care home.
     
  20. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,731
    Thank you for updating this - yes I was amazed at how focussed my Ma could be when she 'needed to' - very strong generation of women.

    I just can't think of anything you else you can do, keep connected with us please x
     

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