Theft

Discussion in 'Legal and financial issues' started by Turner87, Feb 11, 2019 at 10:10 PM.

  1. Turner87

    Turner87 New member

    Dec 17, 2018
    8
    Found out on Saturday that exactly as we had been expecting my fathers niece had been taking a lot of money for him for some time. We took him to the bank and discovered £8000 had gone missing. Some of it paid directly into nieces account. My father got very distressed and the bank called the police who took a statement and copies of the bank statement. My father remembers being in the bank but doesn’t know what she was doing. She’d taken him into branch about five times in the last couple of weeks. He is also telling us that some of his ornaments are missing and he was taken to a solicitor where he doesn’t remember what happened but that she had to say she was his next of kin.

    I just wondered what are the chances of my dad getting his money back? And who do we contact to see what this lady did at the solicitors? I’m not even entirely sure which solicitor it was
     
  2. charlie10

    charlie10 Registered User

    Dec 20, 2018
    79
    @Turner87....that's horrible, how upsetting for you and your dad! With regard to tracking down the solicitor she took him to....can your dad remember roughly where it was? Alternatively maybe your local CAB has a visiting solicitor who can help track it down thro the 'network'? I hope you're able to recover your dad's money, and that he isn't too upset by what this family member did....
     
  3. concerned4

    concerned4 Registered User

    Jun 3, 2012
    40
    #3 concerned4, Feb 12, 2019 at 7:55 AM
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019 at 8:06 AM
    Sadly this is a common occurrence in families, down to greed & exploitation of a vulnerable person, the chances of getting money back are slim, hopefully a lengthy sentence will serve as a form of justice for this wrong.
    The solicitor involved do you know which solicitor it is , they have a duty of care to ensure that your father is not being coerced or manipulated, if they have knowingly allowed this to happen & you have recourse through the LCC.
    Best of luck but how sad it is that those that are supposed to look out for vulnerable persons & trust them for who they are, exploit for their own greed as the most vulnerable are an easy target.
     
  4. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,226
    Female
    Scotland
    Your best chance of finding the solicitor is when the police interview the niece. Part of their questioning should be about that.
     
  5. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,755
    Suffolk
    Surely if father makes yet another will, it would invalidate previous wills? Or doesn’t that apply now?
     
  6. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    8,198
    Female
    South coast
    It may be a POA that the niece has organised, so that she does not need to involve him in withdrawing money.
     
  7. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,226
    Female
    Scotland
    If @canary is right you might have to take him to the bank and shut down that account in case she has opened an online version. The bank could then open a new account for him either in his own name or as a joint account with you.
     
  8. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,128
    Female
    London
    A joint account would also be open to accusations so I wouldn't do that!
     
  9. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,226
    Female
    Scotland
    Yes agreed @Beate. But this is his daughter where as the thief was a niece.
     
  10. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,128
    Female
    London
    It doesn't matter who it is, if there has been fraud already, you don't want to make yourself susceptible to accusations from other corners, whether you have the best intentions or not. The only correct way of managing someone else's money is to obtain POA.
     
  11. Turner87

    Turner87 New member

    Dec 17, 2018
    8
    Hi I took him to the bank which was where we discovered just how much had gone missing. It was the bank who called the police. They’ve put a freeze on his account for the moment so he is only allowed in branch once a week to get £100 and not if this woman is with him. They were very helpful at Lloyd’s and did all they could for us. Police are apparently going to apply for a restraining order against his niece because of her threats and all of this which I hope goes through. I learnt that she had been bringing a large male friend of hers round to shout at my dad and he’s been very frightened. We are getting the locks changed as she has a key. I have contacted the solicitors where he made his Will as they’re the only ones he used to use and they have told me they will investigate the matter. Feel like I need a holiday after all of this.
     
  12. love.dad.but..

    love.dad.but.. Registered User

    Jan 16, 2014
    3,939
    Kent
    Your poor dad..the whole sorry saga made me feel very sad indeed for him. Hopefully with everyone now involved they will work hard to sort this out and put the neice very firmly back in the place from wherever she crawled out from. Are you able to visit your dad often...it sounds as though he will need a lot of continuing reassurance.
     
  13. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,810
    Toronto, Canada
    What a good thing the bank called the police. They are doing what they should.

    It sounds like you've got everything under control. I do hope that a strong penalty applies again your cousin. She is despicable.
     

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