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Thank you for last repsond and here is new issue.

Brightlightside

New member
Jul 17, 2021
5
0
as previously, someone replied to me and thank you for your repsond. But as here is issues and i was busy so i didn't had time to reply or post. So, here is issue, i am self-employed private living in carer for dementia lady. She is 84(as far i know). And when i am giving her food she usually deny food or medicine or what so ever. But when i do leave next to her, its okay. She eat(not much). So this is the issue, after i gave her meal and medicine whenever i came out of room, and do house work, she keep following me mostly everywhere, or watch me, and keep saying i don't like you, you coming over here and there, making messy-! Yeah well i already got it that i shouldn't take as personally, so i just ignore what she saying and just continue what i need to do. But problem is she is keep following me and saying and disturbing my work, so how can i stop her? Even i do make her seating on sofa and turning on tv and giving some drink next to her, few mins fine, but as soon as she hear noisy, she do that.
 

Jessbow

Registered User
Mar 1, 2013
3,704
0
West Hertfordshire
Basically, you cant stop her, she doesnt fully understand what you are doing in her home, maybe suspicious ( without cause maybe)

If she'll eat when you leave food with her, continue to leave her with food. Medication is a bit more difficult as you need to know she has taken it.

Is language a barrier?
 

lemonbalm

Registered User
May 21, 2018
1,731
0
Hello @Brightlightside

Could you give your lady some simple jobs to do while you are doing housework? Something like folding laundry, sorting out drawers, pairing socks for example? She may feel more involved then, a bit more in control in her own home and perhaps less anxious.
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
17,214
0
67
Toronto, Canada
As @lemonbalm has suggested, giving her tasks to do or perhaps asking her how to do whatever you're doing might make her more at ease. Maybe you can ask her how best to dust, hoover or whatever it is you are doing?

She might need to feel included, so perhaps including her in some way might help.