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Terry Pratchett forthcoming programme

tre

Registered User
Sep 23, 2008
1,353
0
Herts
My husband has PCA. I was really pleased with the previous TV programmes where Terry Pratchett who also has PCA told people he had this and that it was a form of Alzheimers. It was somehow an affirmation that people with Alzheimers are not daft or needing to be locked away and I thought he had done a very good thing. My husband and I watched the last programme together.
Why do I now feel so threatened by trailers for his programme next week which is to do with assisted suicide. I am hoping my husband does not notice it and certainly we will not be watching this one together.
What do others think?
The rational part of me thinks "this is a personal thing for Terry" but another part of me feels sad. I would hate my husband to think this is the right way to go.
 

chucky

Registered User
Feb 17, 2011
968
0
UK
Hi, i wouldnt watch it. I have been there and its not good to see and hear how or why someone thinks this is a good way to go. Sometimes too much knowledge is not a good thing.
 

creativesarah

Registered User
Apr 22, 2010
9,630
0
East Hunsbury Northamptonshire
I wouldnt be able to watch it either
a bit too close to the bone
I know someone who was overdosed at the end
and its taken me years to get over it (they didnt have alz)
I felt guilty about it for years and obviously it wasnt my fault
if I can help anyone do pm me
i decided that experiences in life however rough can make you bitter or better
I hope that my experience has made me a better person once I'd worked it all through
and helped me to understand other peoples pain
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,446
0
I do think such programmes are very fraught. On the one hand I think it's a very important issue; on the other it can be way too close for comfort.

I do (rightly or wrongly) tend to think they are more for people who might be on the fence about such things, rather than anyone who has already made up their minds, one way or the other.
 

cragmaid

Registered User
Oct 18, 2010
7,941
0
North East England
I think that it must be an horrendous decision to make; life with no quality versus early death with sad dignity in a country away from home. I would not like to choose either.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
0
SW Scotland
Amanda Plattell in the Mail was very scathing about the film. She sees it as pro-euthanasia propaganda, and turning what is an intensely personal decision into a docu-drama. It actually shows the moment of death, for the first time on TV.

What it doesn't appear to show is the impact on the family.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/a...s-hero-BBC-suicide-documentary-hes-wrong.html

Emmerdale has just shown the assisted suicide of Jackson, who was quadraplegic as a result of an accident. But it is following through with the aftermath, the impact on family and the wider community.

Whatever people's opinion, I do think the debate should be balanced.
 

nicoise

Registered User
Jun 29, 2010
1,806
0
I do know of someone who, faced with the future of living with a deteriorating neurological disease with a potentially very unpleasant terminal process, was very interested in the Dignitas set-up and got the information for themselves.

However, in this instance, to actually travel there would require the assistance of a willing helper - and at that point it would throw up a whole new area of ethical debate.

This person also had stockpiled a fairly large quantity of strong sedative drugs and could have used those without the need to go to Dignitas.

But they didn't.

I felt it was more to do with wrestling back some feeling of control over their life, and being able to make choices when there was a threat that physical/mental infirmity would take that ability away.

Treatment with anti-depression drugs has also now taken away the feeling of helplessness and hopelessness that was pervading that person's life - and the thoughts of Dignitas etc have apparently stopped.

It may well make thought-provoking and information providing viewing for some, but could potentially be very upsetting.

Back to personal choices again - the "off" button is there if it's not for you.....
 

sussexsue

Registered User
Jun 10, 2009
1,527
0
West Sussex
As someone who is pro-euthanasia I will watch it as I am sure it will be thought provoking. I may switch off at the moment of death as it is not something I wish to witness, but that is my choice.

However having watched other programmes on the Dignitas set up I have come away feeling very negative about the option they offer. The thought of travelling to another country, to a soleless block of flats, to end your life, and then have your body repatriated and who ever accompanies you to return home alone, seems unbelievably sad.

I am sure my family would understand why I would wish to end my life before an illness destroyed me, but not the Swiss/Dignitas route.

I know people are not animals, but when I see how lovingly and kindly we have our beloved pets put to sleep before they suffer too much, I wish we were able to afford the same kindness to ourselves.

Before I get jumped on, I would add that I am an aethiest so any thoughts of any afterlife or a God judging me, carry no bearing on my thoughts, and I appreciate that for believers it is an entirely different matter.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
0
SW Scotland
However having watched other programmes on the Dignitas set up I have come away feeling very negative about the option they offer. The thought of travelling to another country, to a soleless block of flats, to end your life, and then have your body repatriated and who ever accompanies you to return home alone, seems unbelievably sad.

I agree, Sue, it's not what I would choose.

I know people are not animals, but when I see how lovingly and kindly we have our beloved pets put to sleep before they suffer too much, I wish we were able to afford the same kindness to ourselves.

Before I get jumped on, I would add that I am an aethiest so any thoughts of any afterlife or a God judging me, carry no bearing on my thoughts, and I appreciate that for believers it is an entirely different matter.

Not for me, Sue. I am a committed Christian, with humanist principles, if that makes sense. I believe God gave me free will.

What bothers me is the impact on those left behind.
 

cragmaid

Registered User
Oct 18, 2010
7,941
0
North East England
If I had a say....

If I had a say in the manner of my demise, it would be to chose a selfish death with dignity over and above death from a disease which took and destroyed any semblance of the person I had been, and yes I also believe that the Lord would understand.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
0
SW Scotland
Well, I watched it, and I have to say I totally disagree with Amanda Plattell. If that was propaganda, then it failed with me. It confirmed for me that this is not the way to go. There was no dignity there whatsoever.

Terry Pratchett did emphasise that the choice was the individual's, and that there were other options.

I was alienated by Mrs Smedley's detatchment. I know I could not have been so calm.

A good point about the difficulty for someone with dementia to know when to make the decision.
 

Christin

Registered User
Jun 29, 2009
5,038
0
Somerset
I agree Hazel. It confirmed for me that its not the way. The man in the hospice seemed far happier. Of course it is a personal decision, I hope I never have to make it.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
72,394
0
Kent
It wasn't good to watch.

I felt so sorry for the wife and mother, neither wanted it but both felt some emotional blackmail not to allow their husband and son to go through this alone.

I have previously thought I would want this for myself. I would not wish to witness it for someone else and would not expect anyone to suffer going through it for me.

If ever I did choose it I would have to be able to do it alone.
 

sallyc

Registered User
Aug 20, 2008
1,674
0
44
suffolk
I watched it.

I've just spoken to my parents.

We all agreed that we are sure that, were Grandad able to make that decision, we think he would have done. :(

I'm not sure it's what I would want, but equally, I'm really not sure I would want my girls to have to witness me going through the full journey of dementia.

I don't want to see Grandad struggle through to the end, though I suspect he will, and of course I'll be involved in his care all the way. :(

My friends tried to persuade me not to watch, given my recent depression.

But I felt I had to.

I think I'll need to take a sleeping tablet tonight. I'm scared of what I'll dream about. :(
 

larivy

Registered User
Apr 19, 2009
5,225
0
67
essex
Part of me thinks it's a good thing if your brave enough to do it the Other half I don't know if I could do it
I nursed my dad for 2years with cancer he asked me many times to help him die I could not do it I know how hard it must have been for him to ask me and I know how he hated living (if you could call it that) I hated watching him and I think he should have been able to choose as long as you are able to decide yourself and there is no chance of your health improving
 

TinaT

Registered User
Sep 27, 2006
7,095
0
Bolton
Why has this post not been moved to Raising Awareness and Campaigning as so many of my posts have been?

TinaT
 

simonmonty

Registered User
Nov 22, 2008
374
0
Yorkshire
In this country we already have a form of euthanasia when we withdrawal medicines and stop treatment for a terminally ill person knowing to do so will bring about the end of their life a lot more quicker. But no one ever questions that decision on morality and even for people who are thought to lack capacity and it happens on a regular basis were people who are considered to lack capacity who have had their medical treatment withdrawn with out their consent just because someone has made the decision their life is no longer worth living!
 

kazza73

Registered User
Feb 11, 2009
878
0
Perthshire Scotland
I watched it and the debate afterwards. I quite strongly believe that it should be everyone's individual right to make an innformed choice for how they want to die, it is imperative that there are strict guidelines etc , but the option should be there.
What is sad is that the 2 gentlemen shown had to make the decision so early simply because in order to make the journey to Switzerland they needed to be physically strong enough. I did feel sorry for the wife and mother having to return home alone, it must have been very difficult for them to be a part of that final journey but the alternative of watching their husband and son dying a slow and painful death would also have been very difficult.
As I watch my lovely mum fade away before my eyes, tormented and distressed , I can't help but think about what she would have made of this debate. In my heart I know what her choice would be.