1. janjan

    janjan Registered User

    Jan 27, 2006
    229
    Birmingham
    :confused: Dad had a mild stroke last week, since then he has started to talk to you when you ask him a question.
    Considering that he hasn't been able to say more than 1 word answers for over 6 months, i can' t understand why now when i saw him after his stroke was he able to string 5 words together. He told mom 4 days after stroke, [ that he felt dreadful ]. Bro and his wife went yesterday, apparently he's had a chat with them too. It was a mild stroke but he has lost a bit of use in left arm, but he's still managing to walk in the N/home, though a bit slower and he seems to be more sleepy than usual. dad has a place available in a EMI home. The home is a stones throw to where mom lives, and a 10 minute walk for me too. I'm hoping to go and see new home this Friday, to have dad so close for mom after her having to get on 3 buses will be worry of my mind and so nice to have him close to our home will be brilliant. But has anyone else come across this before ? :confused:
     
  2. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Jan

    Good news that your dad is able to talk again. I haven't an explanation, It certainly hasn't happened with John, but who knows what goes on in the brain. Just be thankful, I reckon.

    Good news to that you've found a home which is near for both you and your mum. Let's hope you like it when you visit.

    Love,
     
  3. janjan

    janjan Registered User

    Jan 27, 2006
    229
    Birmingham
    I've read CSCI report , and was good. Also friend of mine has worked there in Emi unit a while back an said it has a good dementia unit to the home, so am looking forward to getting the ball rolling and getting dad resettled. :)
     
  4. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,572
    Kent
    I`ve never heard of it Jan. Just shows the complexities of the brain. Enjoy it and good luck for the new home.

    Love xx
     
  5. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Hi janjan

    I not heard of that specifically, but some bizarre things can happen where the brain is involved. There's a book called Musicophilia by Oliver Sachs that documents some of these things specifically related to music. Possibly the stroke damaged the normal pathway and the brain sought to route speech through a different pathway which was clearer of the AD tangles and plaques. On the other hand I think speech is normally controlled by the left side of the brain and you say his left arm is affected which means the stroke was on the right side of the brain. You might want to have a look at this http://www.pslgroup.com/dg/f7fb6.htm
     
  6. janjan

    janjan Registered User

    Jan 27, 2006
    229
    Birmingham
    It has made me think that when dad was younger he was left handed so doesn't that mean his left side of his brain was more dominate. He was forced to write with his right hand which some of his generation was forced to do. My brother is left handed. It does make you rethink about things. Well i really hope dad will be able to talk for a while.
     
  7. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi JanJan

    I could be wrong but I think, someone who is left handed, the right side of the brain is dominant, because each side of the brain controls the opposite side of the body.

    Corect me if I am wrong!

    As an aside, it seems to be a thing in our family, that all the male grandchildren, that is, my brother, my male cousins, all on my fathers side are left handed.

    My Daughter's are also left handed, but then so is my husband, so who knows?
    Alfjess
     

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