1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Toddleo

    Toddleo Registered User

    Oct 7, 2015
    412
    Suggestions please.
    A switch seems to flick in mum's brain after about 4.00pm as the evening begins to draw in. I am assuming that this is what is referred to as sun downing, and it is a huge problem for us.
    She will not sit in a chair for more than 40 seconds or so, and paces restlessly around her rooms (a problem as she is a high fall risk) so I need to pace too. I have tried everything I can think of; keeping it as light and bright as I can, increasing her anxiety drug after lunch (gp advised this) tried to offer her threading toys and sorting toys in bright colours to keep her fingers busy) large print pack of cards to arrange in blacks and reds, that kind of thing, all to no avail, she will not touch the toys - she threw them at me (and was mortified later!) Mum is registered blind, and obviously this does not help in terms of avtivity options.
    What I am looking for is things that may have worked for other forum members regarding the pacing, and "fiddling" ideas for someone who is virtually blind...
     
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,674
    Kent
    Hello Toddleo

    I don`t think you have received any replies so far because no one has the answer. Sundowning is known as a period of restlessness and confusion and that is just what it is.

    My heart used to miss a beat every day when it happened to us and I remember thinking `what will he do this time!`

    I`m afraid all you can do is ride it or ask the doctor for something to calm your mother and see if it helps.
     
  3. Toddleo

    Toddleo Registered User

    Oct 7, 2015
    412
    yes, I understand. Hopefully someone will come up with a few good "fiddling" ideas though for the nearly blind?
     
  4. Crag

    Crag Registered User

    Jan 3, 2015
    76
    I can relate to this. I have posted on here a few times hoping for help when sun-downing arrives, thinking there is a magical answer to this problem. I think it's part of what makes dementia so difficult for the likes of us to deal with it, as nobody yet has that answer.

    Last winter was difficult, but during the warmer months, he wasn't bothering so much with emptying his wardrobe, and wanting to go off to work, etc, but since the dark nights have been back, he's being a problem more regularly. And I'm no better dealing with it now than I was last year I'm sorry to say
     
  5. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    58,719
    Female
    Dundee
  6. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,561
    Female
    Scotland
    I thought we had left this problem behind. Last year was awful but John improved greatly with Trazadone. Now it has returned although not everyday. Last night we had the "got to get ready for work" every half hour and today although we were out all morning and the snow and ice are still lying we are in the "must go to church/ work/ see a man" etc. It is sooooo wearing.

    I tried the two paracetamol last night eventually and it did work after ten minutes or so. Today I have just left him shaving and showering for the umpteenth time as I just can't stand arguing about it. I think I'll take the paracetamol myself!!
     
  7. Crag

    Crag Registered User

    Jan 3, 2015
    76
    And there was me thinking it was just my dad that does this. And it doesn't matter where he is, he wants to go home from work, which was half the problem last night at the hospital. He's in for an operation but thought he was at work, yet on his way to hospital he was thinking he was on his way to church to get married, which went down well with mum.
     

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