1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. gillybean

    gillybean Registered User

    Jan 17, 2007
    420
    My dad has been prescribed Aricept and he appears to be a little more like his old self. Has anyone any experience of this drug and if it's helped them at all?

    Also we think he may have 'Lewy bodies' dementia which has yet to be confirmed.

    Thanks
     
  2. Nebiroth

    Nebiroth Registered User

    Aug 20, 2006
    3,518
    Yes, my Dad was prescribed it about nine months ago and showed considerable improvement in "awareness" - there was a lot less confusion, and misidentification of people and time.

    Do be aware, though, that the drug only treats the symptoms, not the underlying cause.

    All patients are of course different, but we were told that the best we could expect was a temporary slight improvement or slowing down of the decline.

    We found that it made little difference to the memory problems, we were warned about this.

    Sadly some people don't respond to the drug at all.
     
  3. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi
    My Dad has taken aricept for approx 2 years.
    Before Aricept he was very vague and withdrawn. After approx 6 weeks taking Aricept, we noticed a difference. He was more with it, more socially aware, cracking small jokes ( he was a very witty person pre AD) His memory didn't improve, but he was with us, and still is.
    On the other hand, Mother has never been prescribed Aricept. 2 Phyco-geriartrics have said it would not work. Why, I don't know. Maybe heart condition?? She has deteriorated faster than Dad and is much more difficult to deal with (personality maybe.) Maybe Dad has AD and Mum has Vascular Dementia??
    Mother-in Law has been diagnosed with mixed Ad and Vascular Dementia and takes galantamine, she is rapidly deteriorating, but not as fast as my Mother.
    It is all soo confusing, this disease.
    At the present moment I have 3 and they are all different.
    Mother- in- Law doesn't live with us.
    Alfjess
     
  4. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Gonna hyjack this thread to 'talk' just to you Alfjess.

    To deal with one loved one with any form of AD is monumental.............to deal with "three" I just take my hat off to you.

    You have my admiration, and I guess that you "care, with love", anything else that you wan't to add. You make me feel so small. (No, that's not right) I just, sincerly, admire you.

    Take care now,
     
  5. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Alfjess. I agree with Connie. I don't know how you cope with three members of the family with AD. You are amazing.

    Have you got any further with the respite? I guess you need it.

    Love,
     
  6. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi
    Thanks for your concern, but it isn't really as hard as it sounds, I have support from my daughter, husband (who has taken early retirement to support me) and my cousin who helps in the mornings.
    My Mother-in -Law has recently moved to stay with my Bother-in Law, so that has eased thihgs somewhat.
    Yes I have got respite for my Mum and Dad, but that was only with the support of our local councillor, after having to write letters of complaint and attending his surgery.
    Must admit he was very sympathetic, because his wife had cared for her Mum for 14 years and then, I think had a nervous breakdown. So he is now worried more about me than my parents.
    At the moment we have a routine and it works, well most of the time!
    The point I was trying to make in my last post, is how this terrible illness affects everyone differently.
    What works for one, doesn't work for all
    Alfjess
     
  7. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Alfjess

    Iknow what you're saying, and I agree. And I know you weren't complaining.

    But I don't take back the admiration!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.