1. Daisywoot

    Daisywoot New member

    Jul 5, 2019
    1
    Hi there

    My father has alzheimers, received the diagnosis 2 years ago. We requested assistance from the council, however he's been told he would need to pay 12,000 a year for 4 half hour visits a day. As a pensioner with no savings, several thousands of pounds worth of debt and a state pension, he cant afford it (I'm not sure who could in this position?). He has a property that he receives an income from, which is how he survives, but there is no disposable income to hand. We have been told that this property is considered an asset, so he doesn't qualify for assistance.

    Is anyone else experiencing difficulty in accessing support?
     
  2. nae sporran

    nae sporran Volunteer Host

    Oct 29, 2014
    5,802
    Male
    Bristol
    Hullo and welcome to the forums @Daisywoot.
    I'm not sure exactly how it all works beyond the limit of £23,500 of savings that qualifies for assistance. Does your dad get attendance allowance? That is not means tested, though it only amounts to a maximum of £80 per week which might make some contribution. You could the National Dementia Helpline for free advice and guidance.

    0300 222 11 22

    Helpline opening hours:
    Monday to Wednesday 9am – 8pm
    Thursday and Friday 9am – 5pm
    Saturday and Sunday 10am – 4pm
     
  3. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    147
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    This is the source of the problem area, but do not give up. You can ask for the charges to be deferred against the value of the property, but first of all, get a proper assessment from social services they are not interested in who pays for the care, just what care is required.
     
  4. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    971
    I'm not sure that asking for a deferred payment against the property applies for care in your own home . I'm sure others will be along soon with better advice. I'm assuming from the opening post, this is about accessing carers at home. If so,I'm afraid you have to be proactive if you're self funding. There's attendance allowance, council tax reduction, if applicable and my mother-in-law was paying £20 an hour from a private agency
     
  5. Louise7

    Louise7 Registered User

    Mar 25, 2016
    1,141
    A second property which your Father does not live in will be deemed to be an asset and therefore he will be considered a 'self-funder'. As mentioned above, a deferred payment applies to care home fees only, not carers coming in at home. If your father has already been assessed as requiring 4 carer visits per day that is usually the maximum that would be provided prior to social services deeming that a care home is required. Depending on your father's needs it may be time to consider selling the other property. The funds could then be used to pay for carers at home, or care home costs when needed, provide him with an income, and possibly also pay off his outstanding debts. Although keeping the other property provides him with an income if it means that this still isn't enough to pay for the care that he needs then selling the other property may be the best option for him.
     
  6. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,186
    Female
    South coast
    This is definitely the crux of the problem. Property is only exempt if the person with dementia (or other clearly defined person such as a spouse) is living there.
     
  7. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    147
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    My wife has dementia but we look after her at home with a care package agreed with social services. We have a second property in France and the care payments are deferred against this property.
     

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