1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Thurs 29 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Thursday 29 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Start of alzheimer's or dementia or just getting old?

Discussion in 'Memory concerns and seeking a diagnosis' started by Beary, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. Beary

    Beary New member

    Mar 22, 2019
    1
    I am new to the alzheimers forum. I wonder if you could maybe shine a little light for us? My husbands mother is 92 and after spending time in hospital for burning herself, she was moved to a care home afterwards whilst her home was redecorated. She is blind in one eye, and had a room with a shared toilet down the corridor, one night she had urinated in her bin. Now she is home since end of January and about once a week urinate now in the small bin in kitchen. She never ever did this before. We are not sure re her memory as she's always chosen to remember things or not! It seems she can be fine for a few days absolutely OK, then urinate in bucket, fold her clothes up and put them neatly in her trouser leg and place on her bed. We are not sure if it's the start of alzheimers or dementia or just getting old. She lives on her own in a flat with carers 4 times a day, night warden and us popping in. Any suggestions please?
     
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,133
    Kent
    Hello @Beary

    Your mother in law would need medical evaluation to decided whether she has dementia or is just becoming confused in old age.

    I think it`s wonderful she has reached the age she has and is still living in her own home even with so much good support.

    I suppose having a diagnosis would help the family and carers know for sure. Does she receive attendance allowance? If not, a diagnosis would help her get it.
     
  3. chickenlady

    chickenlady Registered User

    Feb 28, 2016
    94
    Ask the GP to check for urine infection as it may be a cause of acute confusion. You could try replacing the bin with a commode and leaving the lid off at night.
     

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