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Stages of dementia

Miss Polly

Registered User
Feb 12, 2014
66
People on this forum talk about the "stages" of dementia. Mum has VaD. I really don't know what stage she is at. Is there a general rule regarding behaviour, physical ability and such? I saw a friend the other day who asked what I had been told about how to deal with Mum when I first began. I realised that actually I hadn't been told anything. It's been trial and error, help from this forum and going on the internet. Who should tell me? I went to a local club for carers of people with dementia. That was very helpful but I haven't been able to go again because I can't go out in the evening unless Mum is in the home for respite. Seems like a lot of trouble to go to just for a (not very wild) night out.
 

Tin

Registered User
May 18, 2014
4,825
UK
Stages used to confuse me at first, wondering how many there were and where the changes fit. Now I do not worry about it. I did ask mums gp if he could give me a definite diagnosis, he told me mum had Advanced Vascular Dementia, so I looked it up, she has some of the symptons. My point is, I'm no wiser and I really do take things a day at a time.
 

stanleypj

Registered User
Dec 8, 2011
10,707
North West
There are several different versions of the stages - threes, fives, sevens, just the kind of numbers you find in myths and fairy tales. So there are plenty to choose from if that's what you want.

It's always seemed to me that knowing what a person living with dementia can't do (and trying to find the best ways of doing it for them) and what they can do (and trying to find ways of helping them to do it for as long as possible) is far more important.
 

Raggedrobin

Registered User
Jan 20, 2014
1,427
I find it useful to think in terms of stages, it helps me understand the possible progress of the disease, even though it affects everyone individually.
 

Not so Rosy

Registered User
Nov 30, 2013
578
Stages don't really help with my Dad. He doesn't know where he is staying at the moment, it vears between a military establishment or the golf club.

Dad can however still speak multiple languages and beat anyone who tries to test his maths into a ****** hat. His wonderful drawing skills remain unchanged too.
 

lizzybean

Registered User
Feb 3, 2014
1,366
Lancashire
Reading posts on here I think of MIL being in late, early stage (if you get what I mean) yet when I look at the stages she has some signs of early, middle & advanced so it doesn't really help. She is where she is, she can do/cannot do certain things & I deal with stuff the best I can.
 

hollycat

Registered User
Nov 20, 2011
1,350
I like all the stages charts for nothing more than a LIST of what we may or may not encounter. It has been said on TP before words to effect of; does it matter what stage. I generally agree as no 2 journeys are the same.

However, I hope the charts provide a list of possible things that may or may not occur.

The lists have helped me as mums carer to have a mich clearer insight into to what MAY occur.
 

Chemmy

Registered User
Nov 7, 2011
7,591
Yorkshire
I like all the stages charts for nothing more than a LIST of what we may or may not encounter. It has been said on TP before words to effect of; does it matter what stage. I generally agree as no 2 journeys are the same.

However, I hope the charts provide a list of possible things that may or may not occur.

The lists have helped me as mums carer to have a mich clearer insight into to what MAY occur.
That's the way I looked at the information too. I'm a person who likes to have an idea of what may lie ahead and have a contingency plan.

Be aware that these are the seven stages of Alzheimer's, not VaD. I don't know if that makes a difference. I found this was the more useful one

http://www.alzinfo.org/clinical-stages-of-alzheimers

And pretty accurate in my mother's case who made is as far as 7d. Be warned - it's a pretty harrowing read, especially if you are just setting out on this journey
 

Miss Polly

Registered User
Feb 12, 2014
66
Thank you for your comments. Yes, I was really just wondering what the next stage might be. I think Mum has got worse recently but my brother doesn't think so. However he isn't living with her. Wanting to go home (while home) is almost a daily occurrence now whereas it used to be perhaps once a week. Incontinence is also almost daily. That hardly ever used to happen. Trying to get out of the locked front door now happens at any time of the day or night. It was 3.30 this morning. 1am the previous morning. It can also go on for hours. When no-one responds she starts banging on the door to attract someone's attention. At 3.30am? I'm hoping it's possibly to do with the hot weather although Mum still complains of being cold and I find her wearing her coat to bed! Feeling very sleep deprived.
 

yoyo

Registered User
Sep 22, 2012
80
I'm sorry I have to say this!! In march I gave in and found a home for mum she was termed as at the severe end of severe - mum has just had 2 major falls resulting in a massive bleed on the left brain, consultant amazed at her recovery because they said she wouldn't survive. my sister has never accepted mums conditions. the other day the consultant came round and said to my sister i don't think the dementia is that advanced and sister said well thats what i've always thought !!!! for god sake why do people say these things? mental health doctor just laughed yesterday when i told her.
swings and roundabouts!! need a strong constitution for this :)