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Specific type of carer required

Jrob

Registered User
Jun 24, 2013
4
0
Hello,

My step dad has mid stage Alzheimers and my mum currently cares for him. In the mornings he becomes very anxious just as she is leaving for work (she organises his time with friends/family etc so he hardly ever has more than 2 hours alone). Mum has to do alot of reassuring even as she leaves, and still this is a stressful way for both of them to start the day. We are now looking to bring in some care to support with the more difficult times like this.

However he is still aware enough to object to/question the idea of a carer being there. Someone advised us on this website to bring someone in under the guise of them being an odd job person, which is a great idea and could work but the times we need them for are 7:30am - 9:30am, which is a bit early for an odd job man. Also, my step dad is 69 but very fit and active and it would be great to find him someone to keep him a bit on his toes. Ideally what we are looking for is a carer disgused as a personal trainer or something! Does such a thing exist or anyone have ideas/connections with different types of carers like this/care agencies that can provide a range of types of carers to suit specific needs?

Thank you

Jessica
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
22,871
0
North Manchester
You might get a befriender - google to find out more in your area - who would come in to help with a crossword/ play a card game / play chess...
 

FifiMo

Registered User
Feb 10, 2010
4,705
0
Wiltshire
What is often more acceptable to the person with dementia is to say that it is help for, say, your mum, because she works. If it was me I would look for someone to come in, do a bit of tidying up, make some breakfast, take stepdad off down to get the paper. Your mum might as well get some advantage out of this too and get some cleaning done. I would look for a cheery assertive type of person. One who can get your stepdad to join in and help with various tasks. This helps him feel useful and needed. He can help make the bed, take the rubbish out, sort out the laundry eg pair the socks, fold the towels. See, not a mention of dementia and his needs...all focused on your mum and her needs! On the bad, non-cooperative days,she can just be some company for him as she goes about her 'duties'.

As to when to find someone,you could try speaking to local council. They will often have lists of firms that supply all sorts and have been vetted by them to ensure that they don't overcharge the elderly or vulnerable and have staff who have been checked too. Much better than picking some random firm out of a phone book, especially when they are going to be in your home and being around a vulnerable person. You could also see if there is a branch of Crossroads in your area ...they are a charity who provide befriending services etc too.

Hope this helps,

Fiona
 

Jrob

Registered User
Jun 24, 2013
4
0
Hi Fiona - thank you thats really helpful,

Jessica


What is often more acceptable to the person with dementia is to say that it is help for, say, your mum, because she works. If it was me I would look for someone to come in, do a bit of tidying up, make some breakfast, take stepdad off down to get the paper. Your mum might as well get some advantage out of this too and get some cleaning done. I would look for a cheery assertive type of person. One who can get your stepdad to join in and help with various tasks. This helps him feel useful and needed. He can help make the bed, take the rubbish out, sort out the laundry eg pair the socks, fold the towels. See, not a mention of dementia and his needs...all focused on your mum and her needs! On the bad, non-cooperative days,she can just be some company for him as she goes about her 'duties'.

As to when to find someone,you could try speaking to local council. They will often have lists of firms that supply all sorts and have been vetted by them to ensure that they don't overcharge the elderly or vulnerable and have staff who have been checked too. Much better than picking some random firm out of a phone book, especially when they are going to be in your home and being around a vulnerable person. You could also see if there is a branch of Crossroads in your area ...they are a charity who provide befriending services etc too.

Hope this helps,

Fiona