Specialised Care and CHC

Discussion in 'Middle - later stages of dementia' started by HarryJones, Nov 29, 2019.

  1. HarryJones

    HarryJones New member

    Nov 29, 2019
    1
    just looking for some guidance. After several months of being in a hospital under assessment with mixed dementia, it was determined my dad needs to be placed into a specialised care home under continual health care due to his particular behaviour and cognitive impairment. He has some savings and owns a house but the house needs maintainance and also ongoing bills to pay like council tax, utilities, cleaning etc. We are thinking to sell the home and put the proceeds into dads bank account, given it is almost certain his health will not improve and he will not return home. is this common practice? thanks, Harry
     
  2. kindred

    kindred Registered User

    Apr 8, 2018
    2,321
    Hello. If your dad has CHC funding, there may not be fees to pay. Check this First. I can't say for sure, but ask how much they want from you for the home.
    Warmest,kindred.
     
  3. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    11,093
    Female
    South coast
    I think this sounds sensible - you dont want the worry of bills, maintenance etc and the longer it is left empty, the harder it is to sell.

    He shouldnt have to pay care home fees if he has been awarded CHC, but CHC is reviewed regularly and is quite commonly stopped if the challenging behaviour improves, so it would be useful not to have to worry about selling if that happened.
     
  4. Roseleigh

    Roseleigh Registered User

    Dec 26, 2016
    286
    Could you rent out the home given the property market is weak at present?
     
  5. Abbey82

    Abbey82 Registered User

    Jun 12, 2018
    67
    Hi there, was he awarded CHC or was he sectioned with 117 aftercare ?
     
  6. Ithuriel

    Ithuriel Registered User

    May 13, 2018
    16
    Hi Canary. I have just seen your post regarding CHC and challenging behaviour. I am interested i what you state regarding CHC being withdrawn if behaviour improves - but what if behaviour gets worse? I care for my mother at home after a long battle to get her out of hospital in 2018, and she is now in a hospital bed in my sitting room. District Nurses attend 3 times a day for personal care but mum has always reacted badly to this and screams and lashes out - perfectly calm again when it is all over. However District Nurses are now seeking methods of trying to remove themselves from the situation as they claim they are not willing to risk staff injuries ( mum scratches and has sometimes bitten on occasion - she is 90 years old but still quite strong!) I fought so long and hard to get her home where she is settled i am extremely worried the District Nurses may wish to withdraw care on the basis they are formulating and then force social services to find a home for her - I know mum wouldn't last 5 minutes in a home and would collapse in to another environment triggered delirium 0 which is what happened in 2018 when she went in to hospital for a chest infection and spent 63 days in there due to delirium which pushed her to her present state ( she was walking with a zimmer frame and still taking meals at table before that happened). can the DN's force the issue like this? Regards Mike
     
  7. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    11,093
    Female
    South coast
    Hi Mike
    Are you sure that it is District Nurses who are attending for personal care? It is usually carers from an agency who do this.
    Yes, a carers agency can indeed withdraw their services if there is physical aggression. I am not sure what else to suggest. Could medication to calm her down help?

    If she did end up in a care home it will be nothing like the hospital environment that caused the delirium. Hospitals are not good placed for people with dementia, but a care home with staff who are experienced in dementia may be able to cope with your mums aggression better than the carers, who often have little dementia experience.
     
  8. Ithuriel

    Ithuriel Registered User

    May 13, 2018
    16
    Thank you canary. It is indeed District Nurses - I have a 'joint package of care' under CHC with PA's allowed to provide meal support etc and the District Nurses who undertake personal care and medications - and it is the personal care that mum gets so upset with. That said I had an MDT meeting yesterday and asked the DN's specifically if they intended to pursue withdrawal on the grounds of their staff health and safety and they rigorously denied this. That said they are the ones pushing for a 'chemical cosh' drug solution whereas the geriatric Psychologist was keen to say that no drugs and improved approach is the best solution. That said a small dose of an anti psychotic drug ( levomepromazine) has been prescribed in agreement with mum's GP on a trial basis - but I understand these drugs can raise the threshold of of the possibility of increased stroke risk - yet the DN's really push for this rather than undertake Dementia Training or a moderated approach. I battled hard to get mum out of hospital and in her own home - with myself - so I really want her to stay here. The memory team in the hospital always maintained ' home is best' and I agree. I work from home 3 days a week to be here too and in March I have accepted a settlement package to finish and be able to be here full time.
     
  9. TNJJ

    TNJJ Registered User

    May 7, 2019
    967
    Female
    cornwall
    I just wanted to say I think you are amazing.I wish I could do what you have done but I’m aware of my limitations. I admire everyone who can be a full time carer to parent/partner. I have a difficult relationship with my dad so it is not possible. I tried it but couldn’t cope with it. :)
     

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