1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

  1. dannyem

    dannyem Registered User

    Mar 31, 2015
    13
    Here I am again, with my head full of not knowing where to turn.....have spoken to the social workers apparently as mom is still "functional" whatever that means she is not top priority......I would debate that - I went up last night and we had a few words as she was attempting to make this cake that was all wrong and I was concerned about the oven being left on as it was nearly 8.30pm then......

    Have also found out that mom hasnt taken a whole weeks worth of anti depressants - she wont let me help her if I try and persuade her to have them whilst Im there.....I am already doing her eye drops every day. I dont see how I can continue with all of this and do a full time job and keep up with two teenagers!

    Should I pester the social workers to help quicker and just leave it - I am constantly anxious about mom to the point of not being able to concentrate on much else....would the GP be a better call for tablets and eye drops?



    Thanks all

    You are all such a help and source of comfort.
     
  2. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,041
    Male
    North Manchester
    Find out from the GP how her health would be affected if she did not take the anti depressants and was unable to administer the eye drops - ie no medication.

    Inform the SW of the GP's reply and ask how she can be considered 'functional'.

    There is no obligation on you to care for you mom, the SW is filing you as 'easy case to deal with'.

    Keep a log of all 'events', this could be invaluable in the future.
     
  3. dannyem

    dannyem Registered User

    Mar 31, 2015
    13
    Thank you - I will try and record everything - its just a daily ongoing thing isnt it? One thing after another.


    I will call the GP and see what they say
     
  4. MissDiane

    MissDiane Registered User

    Oct 18, 2013
    73
    I would inform GP either in writing or phone that mum is not taking her tablets or able to administer eye drops. I would ask if the district nurse could administer the eye drops if they are a medicine, then they have to do this I believe. I would keep ringing the social workers until they do something. It sounds like she needs carers to administer the medicine, sometimes they can do the eyedrops too.
     
  5. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,322
    Female
    East Kent
    #5 lin1, Apr 16, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
    Please don't be patient .
    I am sorry to say that it's the squeakiest wheel that gets the most oil.
    I agree with speaking to Mum's GP explain exactly how mum is , problems with medication, and what the social worker said.

    Sending you a ((((((HUG)))))) As I know only to well the stamina it takes to fight fight fight, they sure don't make it easy do they
     
  6. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,737
    North East Lincs
  7. dannyem

    dannyem Registered User

    Mar 31, 2015
    13
    Thank you - I have printed out that checklist and will update it monthly - ready to produce as and when is needed.

    I wrote to Mom's GP last night voicing my concerns about tablets and so on so hopefully there will be some response from that instead.

    As you all have said, those who shout loudest usually get heard so time for me to "be bossy" as my Mom says I am :p
     
  8. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,659
    North West
    It should perhaps be made clear that this link has nothing to do with the Alzheimer's Society.
     
  9. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,737
    North East Lincs
    Woops Stanley thanks for pointing out my mistake. Nevertheless I think it is a useful check list that moves us way from the endless debate about stages.
     
  10. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,302
    Cotswolds
    It doesn't cover everything of course. However, I filled one in for mum on 1st March, and looking at it can already see substantial changes.....can be useful as an aide memoire, I think :)
     
  11. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,595
    Female
    Dundee
    I think there comes a time when a checklist is no longer useful. Once every point on the checklist is negative GPs/memory clinics are not interested in the progress of the disease. In my experience social workers are not interested in this level of nitty gritty. I say that as someone who has an excellent social worker.

    Having said that I can see it could be useful in the earlier stages.
     
  12. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,659
    North West
    My feeling is that is it starts and ends with negativity. What about smiling, laughing, stroking pets, responding to children, singing along to music, enjoying a joke...... Aren't these pretty important? Of course they will become less frequent and may disappear altogether eventually, and that could be noted as useful information in the same way.
     
  13. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,595
    Female
    Dundee
    Yes. Totally agree!
     
  14. RedLou

    RedLou Registered User

    Jul 30, 2014
    1,162
    You can function independently without smiling, stroking pets etc. which is the point of the document. It's not a tool for measuring quality of life, it's giving an indicator of when someone needs a carer/should go into a care home, as far as I can see.
     
  15. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,595
    Female
    Dundee
    My husband wouldn't score anything on that checklist and it certainly isn't an indicator to me that he should go into a care home.
     
  16. RedLou

    RedLou Registered User

    Jul 30, 2014
    1,162
    But presumably he needs care - yours.
     
  17. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,595
    Female
    Dundee
    Indeed he does. I am also fortunate enough to live in Scotland. I didn't need a checklist to talk to my social worker about what was needed. We have 25 hours of professional care a week.
     
  18. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,659
    North West
    What a sensible system you have!
     

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