1. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,622
    Male
    North Manchester
    "Pensioners expecting a government cap on the cost of elderly social care in England to mean help paying their bill are "in for a shock", a report warns."


    >>>BBC NEWS<<<
     
  2. sistermillicent

    sistermillicent Registered User

    Jan 30, 2009
    2,951
    If anyone understands this article I would be grateful for a simple explanation, have we been bamboozled by the government again because no one has defined what care actually is?
     
  3. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,622
    Male
    North Manchester
    My understanding.

    Care is help given to assist with daily life, it does not include normal living expenses such as "board and lodgings' - hotel costs.

    Moreover the LA will only pay it's tariff amount which will be decided on local factors, it will therefore be possible for a resident to be charged for hotel costs plus £X care costs but only get £(X-x) because the LA tariff is £x.

    Mud any clearer???
     
  4. jaymor

    jaymor Volunteer Moderator

    Jul 14, 2006
    12,305
    Female
    England
    If food is to be paid for in a care home should not food be paid for in a hospital situation?

    Just a thought.

    Jay
     
  5. sistermillicent

    sistermillicent Registered User

    Jan 30, 2009
    2,951
    Thank you Nitram, I got that care will be covered but not daily living costs but surely there is a cross over. I now am clearer about the LA tarrifs and top ups but surely this is to a large extent no better than we have now. I still think someone in government needs to define care - or preferably get a few carers and carees to define it. Maybe this is done somewhere but i doubt it.
     
  6. AlsoConfused

    AlsoConfused Registered User

    Sep 17, 2010
    1,958
    I hear "hotel" costs can be £12K a year. They're excluded from the cap, even though £12K is a lot more than the state pension on which many people live.

    My jaundiced view is that this government wants to pretend to do something to help all those needing social care without actually doing it. Unless you're really well off and / or have a very expensive property (eg in London), you'll get no benefit at all from it.
     
  7. Saffie

    Saffie Registered User

    Mar 26, 2011
    22,499
    Female
    Near Southampton
    This was always the deal. Many journalists pointed out at the time it was agreed that it was not as good as it appeared. It's a gesture, that is all - and one which will make little difference to most people.
     
  8. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,622
    Male
    North Manchester
    Should have added that the life time cap is based on the LA tariff, eg a person paying £600/week when the LA tariff is £300/week would have to spend £144000 before the £72000 cap is reached.
     
  9. Chemmy

    Chemmy Registered User

    Nov 7, 2011
    7,593
    Yorkshire
    I totted up my mum's CH fees for 2005 - 2012 and they came to £192k, so I guess in our situation when she was in there for more than the average length of time, a cap would have been of benefit to us.

    'Not having to sell the house' seems an odd argument to me. Unless there is a spouse or dependant still living in it, wouldn't most people decide to sell it anyway? My MIL's house is now standing empty - once we have confirmed that her CH place is permanent, it will be put on the market and the money invested.
     

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