So much to think about and where to start

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by gele, May 30, 2015.

  1. gele

    gele Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    16
    rochdale area
    Hello all,
    I have posted a few times on different threads and have had some helpful replies but am never sure if Im posting in the best place!
    I have so much to think about and am really in the dark on so many issues.
    Not wanting this to be a long, laborious post, I will keep it as simple as possible and to 1 question at once I think.
    My dad was discharged from hospital into an 'assessment bed' at a care home. He had had a fall at home [lives with me] broke his hip, was told 6 weeks non weight bearing so not able to stay in hospital. He is a left arm amputee with very limited use of his right arm. Now 12 weeks on from the fall he cannot stand-never mind walk, needs hoisting all the time, cannot feed or toilet himself due to even more limited arm movement, has some memory loss/confusion but no formal diagnosis of dementia. I am thinking he may be eligible for continuous healthcare but read that its so difficult to get. Can anyone tell me, do you have to have a dementia diagnosis to have any chance of getting this and from the info I have given would it be worth applying. Also if so, who do I speak to to get the ball rolling. No-one suggested it before his discharge from hospital and I didn't know about it then.
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,776
    Salford
    Hi Gele
    To start the ball rolling my opinion (and it is that just an opinion, others may disagree) that for the purposed of getting CHC dementia seems to increasingly being disregarded by saying it is social care and not medical care which is what CHC is for, that's the vibe I've picked up on here. Obviously by doing this the authorities save themselves money but the morality of it is open to question. I don't know if you're better off concentrating on the medical side of his issues once AZ is thrown in the mix they may use that as a way of getting out of paying CHC. It's strange how having a serious illness like AZ isn't defined as an automatic qualification for CHC if it reaches a certain stage, however, it would appear not.
    K
     
  3. gele

    gele Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    16
    rochdale area
    Thanks Kevini for your response on this. I think I will wait til his reassessment [in 4 weeks] as adult care services I hope will help pursue it.

    I have another question.

    I applied for POA for his finances. I received a letter a couple of weeks ago, along with the original documents I sent off confirming I have got this . I haven't done anything with it yet as I haven't needed to but will need to transfer monies soon. I read on anther post that I need certified copies. Is this the case and will I need to see a solicitor. Basically now I've go it I don't know how to set things in motion. Please help
     
  4. Chemmy

    Chemmy Registered User

    Nov 7, 2011
    7,592
    Yorkshire
    OH had certified copies of his mum's LPA done at the Jobcentre last year. It was a bit of a fag - you have to make an appointment and it's probably best to make sure they know why you're coming in first so they can find out what to do if necessary. :rolleyes:

    The main thing to remember is that you must never let any of the institutions who need to see it have the original. Always send a certified copy.
     
  5. Pete R

    Pete R Registered User

    Jul 26, 2014
    2,045
    Staffs
    I have PoA for my Mom and have never needed a certified copy................Yet.

    If you need access to your Dad's bank accounts just give the bank a ring and tell them what you need and they will make an appointment for you to see someone. Most banks have people trained in this now. You then go along to the appointment with the original PoA (all of it) and proof of your identity. They will copy everything they need and give you back the original.

    With Lloyds it was all done in less than an hour and Santander it took a couple of days. Private pensions and other such organisations can be slightly more complicated.

    Good Luck.:)
     
  6. Isabella

    Isabella Registered User

    Jan 4, 2014
    103
    It's a good idea to get a certified copy as if you need to send it off to anyone to log it then that can take a while to get back and also they may not always return it to you registered post so you risk it going astray. I took mine to a local solicitor who certifiied it for £30. I think that's the same cost as getting another copy from the OPG and at least it's quicker than waiting for a response from them!
     
  7. Bassetlaw Badge

    Bassetlaw Badge Registered User

    Oct 30, 2012
    52
    Don't worry about repeating old threads - I think there's so much on here we can't but help it! I'm just about to post one myself and I'm sure that it's all already on here somewhere, just I haven't got hours to find it! I did wonder if your thread would be similar but don't want to gatecrash!

    I love TP - there are some lovely folk on here that we can all talk to honestly and openly. They understand and relate to us and for that I'm very grateful as nobody outside here wants to talk about dementia......................
     
  8. gele

    gele Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    16
    rochdale area
    Thanks all, Dads finances are quite simple. His money is spread over 3 banks [not a great amount in any but] because he is self funding I need to switch it around a bit for ease of payment. I will make appointments at each bank and explain the situation.
    Thanks
     
  9. gele

    gele Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    16
    rochdale area
    another question - this time dads money

    Hi again, I feel I am bombarding you all with questions but I am in very unfamiliar territory.
    Dads self funding at the moment and looking like becoming a permanent care home resident.
    He lived with me prior to his fall [for 11 years] and was always happy to contribute to the household. He paid a third of the poll tax bill, and food bill, [3 of us at home] and gave me money towards petrol. I know he isn't going to do that anymore and I wouldn't for a second expect it but Im wondering where I stand if he wants to still contribute to my petrol costs.
    I travel 5.8 miles a day every day, sometimes twice a day at weekends when Im not working to visit him.
    I know he would happily contribute to my petrol costs but don't want to get in trouble at a later date if and when his money runs out.
    Would it be seen as unreasonable to spend £10 a week of dads money on petrol for me to visit? I would keep the receipts. I even thought of putting it in writing and asking dad to sign it to say he agrees. Am I being over zealous or is this what would be expected? Thanks
     
  10. its a struggle

    its a struggle Registered User

    When we set up POA for MIL she lived over 120 miles away (now lives about 2 miles away) . She insisted on 'reasonable expenses' for travel, mail, or anything undertaken on her behalf by us, and wrote it onto the form. Not sure how LA would view it, but her intentions are clear, and (if) when the time comes that she can no longer live independently then we have her authority for those things.
     
  11. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,475
    Radcliffe on Trent
    I wouldn't think this is unreasonable, and if your Dad still has capacity to understand the decision why not put it in writing. Maybe get a witness to his signature, perhaps a friend who has known him for some time?

    If you don't yet have LPA to look after his finances, I'd think about that too.
     
  12. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,475
    Radcliffe on Trent
    I wouldn't think this is unreasonable, and if your Dad still has capacity to understand the decision why not put it in writing. Maybe get a witness to his signature, perhaps a friend who has known him for some time?

    Although you have LPA this is a 'belt and braces approach'. It is certainly in your Dad's best interests for you to be able to visit regularly.
     
  13. gele

    gele Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    16
    rochdale area
    Dad has a degree of dementia [undiagnosed as yet, but obvious] However if I explain in simple terms and put it in writing, he will be able to read it and understand it at the time. Whether he will remember doing it the next day is questionable though - he might. Im not sure who could witness it. Dad doesn't have any visitors only myself husband and daughter [whos 10 yrs old].

    I am also thinking of withdrawing £100 per month [decided on this figure as its pretty much what he would get if LA supported financially] to pay for toiletries, chocolate [which he loves] and the like. Again I would keep receipts just in case.

    What about more expensive things like new clothes [ hes lost weight] Can I buy that separately, and finally should the care home hold some money for him. They haven't asked for any but Im not sure if I should give them emergency money
     
  14. Pete R

    Pete R Registered User

    Jul 26, 2014
    2,045
    Staffs
    Although you say your Dad is self funding now I take it that sometime in the future you expect he will need the help of the LA? If that is the case he can spend his money fairly much as he would have done before. It is still his. As long as he isn't getting rid of it with the intention of avoiding his future care fees he/you will be fine.

    Most CH's have a residents account system for trips or organised events.

    I hope he enjoys the chocolate for many years to come.:)
     
  15. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,786
    Female
    South coast
    Paying for new clothes is absolutely fine (although if you are buying Armani shirts and suits from Seville Row there may be questions !)and the amount for toiletries etc is not unreasonable.
    Care Homes usually keep accounts for things organised by the CH - trips out, chiropody, hairdresser etc. You can give them money in advance, but I usually pay it off as and when.
     
  16. gele

    gele Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    16
    rochdale area
    Thanks again for the replies.
    Yes Pete, dad is self funding now but it wont be that long before he drops to the approx. £21k [cant quite remember] where LA will start to support.
    When that time comes I don't want anyone scrutinising and thinking I was trying to benefit wrongly - I would be horrified.
    Dad always collected his pension from the post office in the good old days, then withdrew money from cash machines more lately so we have no real evidence how he spent it like you would if he paid by cheque/cash card. For example if it was my daughters birthday, I would ask him how much he wanted to spend, buy a present to that value, wrap it and he would write a card.
    I wonder if Im fussing/worrying too much
     
  17. Pete R

    Pete R Registered User

    Jul 26, 2014
    2,045
    Staffs
    I can totally understand your concerns as the term "deprivation of assets" is banded around fara bit too freely for my liking. However from what you have said I feel that you can rest easy on what you have done in the past and what you intend to do.:)

    Gifts/birthdays in line with previous habits are fine & I doubt very much that your Dad will be asked to say what he spent his pension on unless of course that when wrapped the pressies for your Daughter were in the shape of a Porsche.:D

    The lower limit for funding is currently £23,250. If your Dad's capital is going to be near that in the near future you should contact your LA for a financial assessment (getting the LPA sorted with the banks will make that easier) as there can be long delays. For my Mom they only wanted the last 12 months of bank statements, others have been asked for less some more.

    Also remember that currently your Dad is allowed to keep £14,250 of his capital to do with whatever & whenever he wants. So if he asks for something out of the ordinary do not be afraid to spend it whilst he can still enjoy.

    :)
     
  18. gele

    gele Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    16
    rochdale area
    thank you Pete.
    You have eased my concerns. youre right - I am concerned re deprivation of assets as its mentioned so often, but no, dad didn't buy my daughter a porshe - me neither! He gave me a deposit for a Renault megane scenic once - bless him - but even that was because he couldnt get in and out of my little car!
    Im off to see him now and feel less anxious about doing the right thing, so thanks again
    :)
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.