Sneak preview of our new TV advert

Discussion in 'Alzheimer's Society notices' started by HarrietD, May 18, 2015.

  1. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,740
    Female
    London
    #21 Beate, May 21, 2015
    Last edited: May 21, 2015
    My OH lives very well with it, as do some others I know. No one should generalise from their own experience.
    It's the carers who often absorb all the stress so maybe next time we can have an ad about impact on carers.
     
  2. Dazmum

    Dazmum Registered User

    I'm wondering if this is to encourage people to go and try and get an early diagnosis if they are worried. If they showed AD as many of us know it in later stages, people would be too frightened to find out what might happen? Just a thought.
     
  3. Ann Mac

    Ann Mac Registered User

    Oct 17, 2013
    3,693
    Well said, Chaucer 1931!

    I am so glad for you, that you feel your OH is living well with dementia - and accounts/reflections of the fact that some people DO live well with it are very important.

    But what's also important is that the message that some people don't, can't 'live well' also has to be addressed - and in addressing that, the impact on families/carers should also be reflected.

    If awarenes is to be raised then the whole story, not just one possible aspect of it, must be covered.
     
  4. Onlyme

    Onlyme Registered User

    Apr 5, 2010
    4,995
    UK
    I watched the ad, didn't work out what it was for until the end and was so mad I threw a cushion at the TV.

    What can be learned from the ad

    1) don't take Grandad to a family gathering as he can't cope
    2) he just forgets things
    3) he can sit down quietly while we get on with life

    As Ann's daughter said this must be a very different Dementia than the one I have supported.
     
  5. GarageDragon

    GarageDragon Registered User

    Jan 20, 2015
    28
    What would YOU show in an advert?

    I must admit, my first thought was along the lines of upset that here's another illustration of how simple it is to make everything better with and for someone suffering from dementia - but try as I might, I can't think of how you could possibly show anything of how truly awful it could be. The audience may be comprised of anyone and everyone, including those with capacity to realise the problems they are having (including how it is impacting on others), and those contemplating seeing a GP about worrying symptoms (that might be something else entirely).

    A 'middle ground' has been suggested, but I can't puzzle how to manage it (I am in no way trying to suggest that it can't be done, just that I can't at this moment work it through, but I know that there're a lot of smart problem solvers on here): How would you do it?
     
  6. Onlyme

    Onlyme Registered User

    Apr 5, 2010
    4,995
    UK
    An middle to elderly person walking about what was obviously their house asking to go home, for their Mum, asking their daughter who she was, is it breakfast time, getting upset that she has mislaid the baby (at 80+), walking about the house in the middle of the night, making phone calls to family as someone has stolen her purse and she needs to go shopping, why hasn't her husband come in from work etc.

    To me non of these would be shocking, more truthful and hopefully bringing a snapshot of what life was really like.
     
  7. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,239
    Cotswolds
    Hmmm....actually the ad was better than I had expected, as it showed some of the distress and loneliness that can be experienced by sufferers.....I've seen that look on mum's face so many times!

    I guess what's needed is a series of ads, to build up knowledge and awareness. I like Onlyme's idea for non-graphic but more serious implications, and something about the effect on carers should be done, too.

    I agree with AnnMac, they lost it in the last few seconds, with the implication that hand-holding is enough....:(
     
  8. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,776
    Salford
    I think the tone of the ads is about right for what is an awareness campaign, it's not aimed at us we're already aware.
    To those who say it's not hard hitting enough, please google "hard hitting charity ads" this is what you get, links to articles in various news papers say "Are charities going too far in using shocking imagery in their adverts?" (the Guardian), "The hard-hitting charity adverts that are too violent for children: Kids upset by frightening content, research shows" (Daily Mail).
    The Advertising Standards Authority produced a report regards hard hitting charity ads in which they say "Traditionally, we've granted more leeway to these types of advert because of the importance of the issues they raise awareness for. But our research has prompted us to question whether we're getting things right,"There was a sense that this type of approach is to some extent a necessary evil." Simply many people see hard hitting ads as a turn off.
    I for one wouldn't be impressed if the ad showed someone in late stage ranting, being violent and generally smashing the place up, I think that would do more harm than good portraying that side of things when what you want is people to be more understanding, willing to accept and compassionate how would using Hannibal Lector as your role model help, you'll just make the whole thing even scarier and risk making the public feel more at risk.
    I think as an introductory awareness set of ads the AZ socity have got it about right, well done.
    K
     
  9. lexy

    lexy Registered User

    Nov 24, 2013
    563
    #29 lexy, May 21, 2015
    Last edited: May 21, 2015
    What about showing some of the problems like repetitive questions being asked, this nearly drove me mad, or someone needing to be fed, or perhaps eating with their fingers, could show someone refusing to be washed and needing persuading, in a subtle way, of course.

    I never found anyone much who seemed to have a clue about dementia or the misery and heartbreak this illness can cause, I wished I had had more knowledge about dementia. I read many posts on here saying no one seems to be dementia trained or know much about the illness but if no one ever shows the types of behaviour that a person with dementia may or may not display there is not much point in complaining.

    I think the impact on carer's should be addressed also.

    When I have watched the "Stroke" advert showing someone with a hole appearing in their head, it made me aware but it did not upset me unduly.
     
  10. Hair Twiddler

    Hair Twiddler Registered User

    Aug 14, 2012
    884
    Middle England
    Like many others who join in on TP I consider myself to see "the sharp end" of dementia in my mum.
    Unlike many others who join in on TP I do not have dementia. yet.

    I really cannot see the point of the ad.
    Is it to encourage those who can identify with some of the signs in the ad to go see their doctor about themselves or a loved one? IMO - it won't work. People put these such things off 'til tomorrow or until 'things get worse'. Not money well spent on creating the ad.

    Is it to be hard hitting and create awareness? IMO - no. People who don't get to see/experience dementia regularly will soon forget the ad. IMO - not money well spent on an ad.

    Do politicians and those in the Treasury office watch ITV, Channel 5 etc etc and think to themselves " BY GOLLY! That's news to me!!!!!!I really must put millions of pennies aside to do something about this!". Nah.

    Sorry to be so negative - I've simply had a bad day with the reality (only mine!) of it all.
     
  11. Chaucer 1931

    Chaucer 1931 Registered User

    Mar 30, 2014
    226
    I would rather my children's generation have a full awareness of facts,insight about dementia,certainly not shock tactics for the sake of education,but definitely not a sugar coated Disney version of life with Dementia as it offers nothing more than a blanket to stereotype and still stigmatise mental health/Dementia.

    The recent adverts for discouraging smoking,by gory/Goryfying a cigarette were shock tactics-albeit,in your face this may happen to you if you start smoking/do not stop smoking,It didn't send people running for cover.

    I'm not saying let's horrify Joe Public for the sake of dementia education,but this is the 21st century and people are still uncomfortable with talking about,asking for help and many do not know what the many facets of dementia entails,it is still stigmatised,and seen by some walks of life as shameful,or a dirty secret in the family,not exactly we ought to be propagating..
    I would rather watch adverts/read/listen to adverts that educate people,let's have all the facts,to RAISE awareness,than an odd random sugar coated pill of a campaign any day!



    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  12. Rageddy Anne

    Rageddy Anne Registered User

    Feb 21, 2013
    5,984
    Cotswolds
    I Agree!
     
  13. Piggy88

    Piggy88 Registered User

    Nov 29, 2012
    1
    What exactly is the message?

    I think that the advert is trying to hit lots of different targets: "Alzheimer's is very isolating for the sufferer"; "Alzheimer's robs you of your connection to your family and to your former life"; "You'll be forgotten when you have Alzheimer's" (empty chair); "Your family and friends will leave you when you have Alzheimer's" (man sitting at table alone); "Alzheimer's is not as bad as you think" (final message); "The Alzheimer's Society will help you through this difficult time"; "Life goes on after a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease". Is it aimed at people experiencing the early signs, to get them to seek a diagnosis and get help? Is it aimed at families and friends of sufferers, to show them how puzzling and disorientating hitherto normal situations can prove? The message just seems rather unclear and I think that that is probably because it has not been really
    defined in the minds of the people making the advertisement. I can see that it's good to 'get the message out there' but I'm not quite sure what the message actually is. At a guess, I'd say that this will probably frighten sufferers in the earlier stages and possibly mislead carers and other people within their sphere who are not yet in the know. But perhaps all media exposure and reminders are good, because they help to prompt people to donate funds to help research into Alzheimer's?
     
  14. martin0

    martin0 Registered User

    Apr 15, 2013
    1
    Great ad

    I really like your ad. If this an accurate presentation how Alzheimer's is really perceived, it feels very like other mental illnesses, depression, anxiety, and stress confusion.
    Having suffered the later due to a terrible crisis of identity I wonder that my parent's disease is so different from my experience I sasdly have an overly optomistic view that there is a chance that they might recover like that nice at the libel trial.

    It does not do my mental health any good
     
  15. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,815
    UK
    Just seen your 2nd advert. This one really worked for me, Has a sense of urgency about it. Sound bites and images really good.
     
  16. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,234
    Male
    North Manchester
    "Just seen your 2nd advert. This one really worked for me, Has a sense of urgency about it. Sound bites and images really good."

    Are you thinking of the one by ARUK not AS?

    https://youtu.be/f0YLcLxB77Y

    I also think this is a better advert for raising awareness.
     
  17. sistermillicent

    sistermillicent Registered User

    Jan 30, 2009
    2,949
    I totally agree with you, these messages should be clarified.
    The ad has upset my dad, who has cared for mum through the absolute torment of her illness. He feels it is patronising and that the Alzheimers Society doesn't "get it". Mum didn't feel isolated, she felt tormented and depressed and useless and absolutely terrified. From very early on. Nothing we said or did could reassure her, and why should it because what has happened to her has been beyond her worst nightmare.
    Depict that in an advert.
     
  18. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,815
    UK
    Thank you that is the one, wrongly I thought they were all one society. Watched some of the stories too.
     
  19. Weary

    Weary Registered User

    Aug 1, 2014
    86
    #39 Weary, Jun 19, 2015
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2015
    Alzheimer's TV advert inadequate!

    The advert currently on tv for Alzheimer's is a joke! "Life doesnt end when alzheimers begins"??? What a load of bull - it does! Why when they have the oportunity to show just how devestating this horrible disease is are they showing this? People who have no experience of it have no idea!- they think alzheimers is just loss of memory. They dont show how it changes a persons personality, makes them nasty and suspicious, makes them sometimes violent, makes them frightened and halucinate, they dont shown the physical changes so you barely recognise your loved one and how it robs the sufferer and their family of everything. Why cant they show a film clip of a person before and then after Alzheimer's has taken everything?

    Whats the point of showing this nanby panby advert? Life does end when alzheimers begins. Normal life for sufferer and family ends and always ends in tears - there is no cure and things only get worse!Show it how it is - a living hell for the sufferer and their family - then the donations will roll in and more people will realise and take it seriously. Rant over.
     
  20. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,776
    Salford
    Hi Weary
    We did discuss this when the ads first came out, my comment at the time was
    "I think the tone of the ads is about right for what is an awareness campaign, it's not aimed at us we're already aware.
    To those who say it's not hard hitting enough, please google "hard hitting charity ads" this is what you get, links to articles in various news papers say "Are charities going too far in using shocking imagery in their adverts?" (the Guardian), "The hard-hitting charity adverts that are too violent for children: Kids upset by frightening content, research shows" (Daily Mail).
    The Advertising Standards Authority produced a report regards hard hitting charity ads in which they say "Traditionally, we've granted more leeway to these types of advert because of the importance of the issues they raise awareness for. But our research has prompted us to question whether we're getting things right,"There was a sense that this type of approach is to some extent a necessary evil." Simply many people see hard hitting ads as a turn off.
    I for one wouldn't be impressed if the ad showed someone in late stage ranting, being violent and generally smashing the place up, I think that would do more harm than good portraying that side of things when what you want is people to be more understanding, willing to accept and compassionate how would using Hannibal Lector as your role model help, you'll just make the whole thing even scarier and risk making the public feel more at risk.
    I think as an introductory awareness set of ads the AZ socity have got it about right, well done."
    Here's a link to the thread.
    K
    http://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/showthread.php?82587-Sneak-preview-of-our-new-TV-advert
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.