Smoking

jan.

Registered User
Apr 19, 2006
405
Cheshire, UK.
Natashalou said:
sorry, I had assumed he was a nursing home resident. I think this is possibly slightly different. the nursing home isnt "his" home and therefore my previous comments wouldnt apply (at least to him)
Presumably (and this is an assumption) this scenario of ??respite?? is similar to many hotels which operate a non smoking policy. If you smoke, you cant book a room.
Sad for smokers, but true.
Natashalou, I can see where your coming from BUT....... as far as i see it when i book dad in for respite and pay good money for the privilege, the home becomes " his home " for as long as it`s required, therefore i believe he has the right to pursue whatever activity/habit he needs to ensure his equilibrium is maintained. If that means providing "shelters " outside, then that should be the case, IMHO. Dad has smoked since the war and i don`t see why he should give up now.....especially as he has given up whiskey last August after being an alcoholic for most of his life! He has nothing else! Sad but true.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
71,507
Kent
That`s a really positive attitude, Jane. I wish I`d thought of it.

There was a resident in my mother`s home, admittedly she was a resident, who had a very bad cough. They wanted her to stop smoking, so they increased the time between each cigarette, and when she asked for one, said `You`ve only just finished one `.

Jan, is your dad allowed his own matches or lighter in the home?
 

jan.

Registered User
Apr 19, 2006
405
Cheshire, UK.
No Sylvia,
they regulate him as he would smoke one after the other otherwise. Can i just
say that when dad was in hospital last August, he was given patches, which
worked well, but he WANTED to smoke because he couldn`t drink anymore. I don`t feel i have the right to deny him ALL pleasures of life.

Love Jan.
 

jan.

Registered User
Apr 19, 2006
405
Cheshire, UK.
Skye said:
Jan, just caught up with this. I think it's outrageous. We've had a smoking ban in Scotland for a couple of years, but all the NHs in this area have a residents' smoking room.

They can't possibly expect your dad to give up smoking at this stage, or expect you to give up your plans because they misinterpret the rules.

I'm not surprised you're angy and upset, and good for you for fighting your corner. I hope you get things sorted out with SS, I can't see they've a leg to stand on.

Love,

Hi Hazel,
Just wanted to say thanks for your support. :)

Love Jan.
 

Natashalou

Registered User
Mar 22, 2007
426
london
oh yes

jan. said:
Natashalou, I can see where your coming from BUT....... as far as i see it when i book dad in for respite and pay good money for the privilege, the home becomes " his home " for as long as it`s required, therefore i believe he has the right to pursue whatever activity/habit he needs to ensure his equilibrium is maintained. If that means providing "shelters " outside, then that should be the case, IMHO. Dad has smoked since the war and i don`t see why he should give up now.....especially as he has given up whiskey last August after being an alcoholic for most of his life! He has nothing else! Sad but true.

I dont disagree, but im simply pointing out the home presumably has the right to decline the booking.
At least you have the information! imagine turning up and finding out on the day he wasnt able to smoke. I do hope a solution can be found for you and dad. !!
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
71,507
Kent
When my grandmother was in her eighties, she had a cough. She`d smoked from being a young woman. She asked the doctor should she give up and he replied, tongue in cheek, `No I don`t think that`ll be necessary`.

When she was in her NH, she wasn`t allowed matches, so had to ask. She gave up gradually, without even knowing she`d given up.

But for your father Jan, an ex-alcoholic, I feel he is being shown no compassion.

When we go to our local hospital for outpatient treatment, there are quite a few smoking shelters in the grounds. Will these be demolished?
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
Oh your father going into respite , so why not get social worker to look for a home that he can smoke ?

even if its outside your area
 

janetruth

Registered User
Mar 20, 2007
563
nuneaton
Hi Jan

Don't think of it as denying him his only pleasure, nicotine is a drug. If he can't get the cigarettes himself and relys on you to get them, then you will have to be VERY strong.
Yes, you will get the backlash, but You will end up with the holiday, you are so looking forward to and deserve.
Let them know that your dad is going to pack up smoking, but could be on patches during his stay.
Give your dad somrthing to do with his hands, to keep him busy, and DON'T let anyone buy him fags or smoke around him.
Good luck Jan

Bye for now
Janetruth x
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
I went to a residents' meeting at my mum's nursing home. The manager said that when the new laws come in residents won't be able to smoke in their bedrooms. They presently only have one smoking resident. If he was allowed to smoke in his room then the staff would have to be allowed to refuse to go into that room. Also, if he left or died, they would have to leave the room empty for 4 weeks before they could give it to a new resident. I don't know whether that's the law or not as I haven't studied it in depth - that's just what they said. They have decided that the room which is presently the visitors' lounge will become the smoking room, even though guests and staff will not be allowed to smoke, only this one resident and any other smokers they may admit in the future. They did say that they had the option of refusing to admit any smokers but decided against it as they are owned by a charity and it would be seen as discriminatory. One of the other relatives made the point that they might end up with a disproportionately large number of smokers if other homes in the area decided not to admit smokers! :eek:
 

janetruth

Registered User
Mar 20, 2007
563
nuneaton
Hi jan

What I was trying to say was, maybe your dad could manage for 2 weeks on patches, then you can have your holiday,. just a temporary solution.

Hi Margarita,

I enjoy reading your posts, they are informative and like others have mentioned you are also funny and cheer me up.
I'm sorry if I gave the impression that Jan should force her dad to give up smoking, I was trying to give her an alternative option.
Bye for now
Janetruth x
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I don't know whether having residents bedrooms as a smoking zone would be against the law from the point of view of workers either: there were pages and pages of stuff which I didn't feel inclined to wade throiugh to be honest. And also, to be honest, I think I would be more than a little uncomfortable with the idea of a dementia sufferer being able to smoke in their room from a safety stand-point - my mother drops off just like that, and I'm sure that's as much to do with her age as her stroke. At least your mother's home, Brenda, is making an effort.

Jennifer
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
My mother went into a respite nursing care home last year , that had a smoking room , and they don’t let the residences keep matches or lighter in they room they have to ask the staff for the lighter as they keep it in the office , because of fire risk , heath & Safety rules, as one residents near set fire to her room .

OIC Jane Just Perceived it wrong , me being a smoker knowing how hard it is to try and stop smoking even with nicotine patches, I know every one different for me it’s a form of self medication really , nicotine is a drug , but a legal drug.

I also was thinking alone the line also that exbixa for last stages of AZ have nicotine in it, so really your idea is a good one putting the patch on.

Depending on Jan father progression what stage he is in would be willing to do that.

I am sorry if I sounded abrupt jane xx((hugs))
 
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Natashalou

Registered User
Mar 22, 2007
426
london
Yes

Grannie G said:
When my grandmother was in her eighties, she had a cough. She`d smoked from being a young woman. She asked the doctor should she give up and he replied, tongue in cheek, `No I don`t think that`ll be necessary`.

When she was in her NH, she wasn`t allowed matches, so had to ask. She gave up gradually, without even knowing she`d given up.

But for your father Jan, an ex-alcoholic, I feel he is being shown no compassion.

When we go to our local hospital for outpatient treatment, there are quite a few smoking shelters in the grounds. Will these be demolished?

I think they will. When my mother was in a large, well known hospital in West Sussex, there were huge signs saying the WHOLE complex was a NO SMOKING zone, and smoking wasnt allowed even in cars!
This didnt bother me as I dont smoke but I saw security guards knock on the car windows of sinners having a crafty cigarette and asking them to leave the hospital grounds.
This seemed a little big brother even to me, but I woule expect all trusts to introduce this soon
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
You're not supposed to smoke even in the grounds of our nearest large hospital but many people do and I have never seen anyone being challenged.

It does make the entrance/exit areas rather unpleasant though!
 

Lila13

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
1,342
There are huge notices by the entrances of our local hospital telling people how far away they are supposed to go to smoke but I don't think the message has got through yet. People in their pyjamas/nighties and staff too taking a break from their wards to smoke and use mobile phones.
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
Lila13 said:
There are huge notices by the entrances of our local hospital telling people how far away they are supposed to go to smoke but I don't think the message has got through yet. People in their pyjamas/nighties and staff too taking a break from their wards to smoke and use mobile phones.
I think the rules on use of mobile phones in hospitals may well change. There is a school of thought that says the people most interested in banning the use of mobile phones in hospitals are those who operate the bedside payphones that most hospitals have now.

It also seems doubtful that their use is in any way dangerous - although I'm no expert.
 

sue38

Registered User
Mar 6, 2007
10,854
52
Wigan, Lancs
This is such a hard one isn't it?

Whereas I'm sure most smokers would agree that non-smokers have the right not to breathe in their smoke, most non-smokers would agree that people have the right to do as they choose in their own homes.

The problem here is that the smoker's home (even temporarily) has become a public place where care workers can expect to work in a smoke free environment. Many of the residents in care homes were brought up in a time when smoking was the norm and for some smoking is the only vice that they can now enjoy.

I don't think it's just an addiction to nicotine which patches can help, but pure habit. In addition, in the case of people in care homes and particularly those with dementia who can no longer read or watch TV, it comes down to pure boredom.

I couldn't find anthing under the Human Rights Act (only a quick glance) which gave an answer either way.

I suspect that when the law has been in place for some time and comes in to force in England there will be cases against the policy of Local Authorities to ban smoking in care homes owned by them, but privately owned care homes will be able to formulate their own policies.

Sue
 

janetruth

Registered User
Mar 20, 2007
563
nuneaton
Hi Margarita

Thanks for hug.x
I was a smoker, from the age of 14 until 44 ( I am 55 now) so I do understand where ALL smokers are coming from. I had my Thyroid Gland removed 11yrs ago and made a decision to pack up FOR GOOD while I was in hospital.
It wasn't easy, but it was the right time, for me.
I would have been at the front of the marchers with my banner, protesting for the right to smoke where I wanted.
I am not anti smoking but now I can see it from both sides.

Take care Bye for now.
Janetruth x
 

jan.

Registered User
Apr 19, 2006
405
Cheshire, UK.
Hi,

Thanks to all who have contributed to this thread. Firstly i`d like to say, that i was

rather irrate earlier today and if i sounded abrupt i`m sorry it wasn`t intentional.

All i want is some fairness shown to people like my dad who have been lifelong

smokers, do not want to give up at this late stage of their lives and that if they

want to smoke there should be somewhere out in the grounds where they can

have their smoke without upsetting anyone. Dad does not smoke in our home, he

smokes in the garage. He`s happy with this compromise. The trouble is, that

with all the bureaucracy i think the care and compassion has been stripped away,

and no thought has gone into the rippling effect it`s going to have on those of us

who care for a smoker. To just turn their backs on the problem is no solution and

some form of compromise has to be found. IMHO it feels like a dictatorship from a

government and L.A`s( bordering on a witch hunt! ) devoid of compassion for

those that are the most vunerable and easy targets in our society. As i said this is

only how I see it, many other people will see a different perspective.

Again thanks for the input, there has been a lot of very interesting info that i`m in

the process of looking into.

Love to all,
Jan.:)