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Small study reignites hope for Alzheimer's treatment

Discussion in 'Dementia-related news and campaigns' started by jimbo 111, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. jimbo 111

    jimbo 111 Registered User

    Jan 23, 2009
    5,080
    North Bucks
    Small study reignites hope for Alzheimer's treatment
    Bill Berkrot, Reuters
    Mar. 20, 2015, 7:38 PM


    Read more: http://uk.businessinsider.com/r-bio...line-in-early-study-2015-3?r=US#ixzz3V1LFivWJ




    Biogen’s Alzheimer’s Drug Impresses in Early Trial

    By
    Joseph Walker
    Updated March 20, 2015 6:00 p.m. ET

    A Biogen Idec Inc. drug that targets plaque buildup in the brain slowed cognitive decline in patients with early and mild forms of Alzheimer’s disease in a small, early-stage study, lifting the company’s stock to all-time highs and adding to the debate on how to treat the debilitating disease


    Biogen’s drug, also known as “BIIB037,” is designed to help clear the brain of beta amyloid plaques, which many scientists say play a role in causing Alzheimer’s, a progressive, memory-destroying condition associated with older age.
    Read more

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/biogen-details-data-from-early-stage-alzheimers-drug-study-1426844101
     
  2. Bernadette2

    Bernadette2 Registered User

    Mar 13, 2015
    27
    Yes, and what about ultrasound "break through" in Australia - a drug free approach using ultrasound to try and clear brain plaques. 75% positive with mice and hoping to test on humans in 2017...
     
  3. Owly

    Owly Registered User

    Jun 6, 2011
    538
    And why do the plaques appear? I have found sites talking about how they are antimicrobial. It makes me wonder if some kind of infection is taking root in the brain, whether it is fungus/yeast-candida/bacteria/viral/Lyme or whatever. The brain produces amyloid proteins as part of the immune system, but too much and it cannot clear away the plaques.

    I've started putting chopped garlic in my Dad's meal when I visit each week. He doesn't have dementia and I hope he doesn't develop it (he's 82). There are other antimicrobial herbs/spices that you can google. Also those probiotic yoghurts that help to keep your body's necessary bacteria in balance. Even coconut oil is said to be antibacterial, maybe it's not just helpful because it is "fuel for the brain" as many people claim, but also because it reduces the brain's need to combat infection.

    When people have urine infections and their dementia worsens, I wonder if the infection is actually systemic and that would explain why the brain improves, as the antibiotics clear away the infecting agent.

    Too many antibiotics though can put the whole body's microflora out of balance and then you are on a slippery slope to continued infections throughout.
     
  4. Owly

    Owly Registered User

    Jun 6, 2011
    538
    re what I wrote above -

    "Infections

    An intriguing theory that remains largely unappreciated by the medical community is that chronic infection with a variety of pathogenic bacteria and/ or viruses may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Research indicates that some common pathogens are consistently detected in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. For example, a comprehensive analysis of studies found that Spirochetes, a family of bacteria, was detected in about 90% of Alzheimer’s patients and was virtually absent in healthy age-matched controls. Further statistical evaluation revealed a high probability of a causal relationship between Spirochetes infection and Alzheimer’s disease (Miklossy 2011).

    Spirochetes and other bacteria can linger in the brain and drive inflammation and the formation of amyloid beta and neurofibrillary tangles, all of which are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (Miklossy 2011). Moreover, laboratory studies indicate that amyloid beta is an antimicrobial peptide, suggesting its formation could be an adaptive response to infectious organisms (Soscia 2010). These and other findings have led some researchers to hypothesize that “…early intervention against infection may delay or even prevent the future development of [Alzheimer’s disease]” (Honjo 2009)."

    http://www.lef.org/Protocols/Neurological/Alzheimers-Disease/Page-02
     
  5. Bernadette2

    Bernadette2 Registered User

    Mar 13, 2015
    27
    Fascinating stuff Owly thanks - Urine infections really do seem to make the dementia conditions worsen...
     
  6. mojo1943

    mojo1943 Registered User

    Dec 19, 2013
    722
    North Devon
    a great thread - lets hope for lots more good news - somewhere somehow sometime a cure for Alz VaD is going to happen - we all should try to make it happen sooner rather than later....mo43
     
  7. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,680
    North West
    I've come across the idea that previous infections of various kinds can lead to cognitive decline. This is an article about one such piece of research but there are others too.
     
  8. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,680
    North West
    Of course this kind of research makes the widespread assumption that removing beta amyloid plaques is a good thing, but I'm sure there is research that found that this is not necessarily the case. I'll try to track it down but perhaps someone else can provide the links?
     
  9. Owly

    Owly Registered User

    Jun 6, 2011
    538
    Stanley, I have seen mention of that on my travels round the web. Removing the amyloid plaque didn't really help the cognitive faculties to return. That's why I wanted to highlight that stopping the amyloid proteins from forming in the first place, quite possibly as a response to infection, might be the best way forward.

    The link you gave brought up an annoying blue box that I couldn't get rid of, but I was able to read the name of several infective agents on the synopsis. Thank you.

    I don't think it should be beyond the wit of these scientists to come up with an anti-infective agent that could be offered as soon as cognitive decline becomes apparent, to stop the brain producing further amyloid??
     
  10. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,680
    North West
    I agree. It would involve lots of different drugs depending on the nature of the infection. But if Sue, who was known to carry several dodgy viruses, had been treated when she 'only' had mild cognitive impairment she might still have MCI rather than an advanced dementia. Even so, the steps that we have taken to suppress HSV1 appear to have helped at least as much as the handful of dementia drugs help some other people.
     

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