1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

  1. Bod

    Bod Registered User

    Aug 30, 2013
    1,164
    Noticed a comment in another thread, regarding slow eating.
    MiL is taking longer than she used to, in eating her food at home, not quite so bad eating out.
    Is eating slower common?
    At present MiL will just about eat a small portion of 1st course, taking her time. Dessert is eaten slowly but in reasonable time.
    It won't be long before she has a babies plate, with hot water under it!
    Teeth and mouth checked by dentist, so no problems there.

    Bod
     
  2. sleepless

    sleepless Registered User

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,232
    Female
    The Sweet North
    My husband certainly takes a lot longer to eat his meals (Alzheimer's for twelve years) -- I used to sit and wait for him to finish out of politeness, but he takes at least twice as long as I do, so I can have the dishes washed and put away by the time he finishes his dessert. Up to now it has never bothered him that his food is going cold, and I know better than to break his concentration by removing it to reheat, as he would probably not resume eating.
    Having said all that, I turned away for a moment recently, and a portion of tiramisu disappeared so quickly that I still catch myself scanning under the table in search of it!
     
  3. jaymor

    jaymor Volunteer Moderator

    Jul 14, 2006
    12,494
    Female
    England
    My husband can take up to an hour to eat a small puréed meal. He chews each mouthful even though it is puréed and his food is always cold but it does not appear to bother him. His dessert goes down in about 10 minutes sometimes his mouth open for the next spoonful before I have the spoon reloaded. He certainly has a sweet tooth.
     
  4. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,548
    south-east London
    My husband definitely takes longer to eat his meals these days. He enjoys his food and is able to feed himself - he just takes a little longer with cutting it up, chewing or deciding what he should eat next on the plate.
     
  5. sleepless

    sleepless Registered User

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,232
    Female
    The Sweet North
    That is interesting, jaymor. I wonder if sweet things encourage more saliva and are easier to eat?
     
  6. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,590
    Female
    Dundee
    Just to be different, my husband is the opposite. Before dementia (14 years since diagnosis) he was a slow and careful eater who hardly ever ate everything on his plate. Now he eats as if he is in an Olympic race and eats every last scrap. I have to eat with my fork in one hand and my other hand keeping his from putting more food in his mouth.

    Also he always had a sweet tooth but even more so now. I think this is very common.


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  7. Slugsta

    Slugsta Registered User

    My mother has always eaten slowly. When my son was very young he asked Daddy why Grandma eats so slowly. Daddy thought it was amusing to explain that it was because Grandma likes to masticate properly. It wasn't quite as amusing when our son asked Grandma the inevitable question... :eek:
     
  8. hvml

    hvml Registered User

    Oct 10, 2015
    300
    North Cornwall
    My Dad is a bit like this too. He was always very abstemious and would never eat between meals, but now he forgets he has eaten and can't get enough. He really enjoys his food and now that we eat together at lunch time when my brother and sister in law are at work, he enjoys the social side of it. When we all ate in the evenings, my brother would get affronted by Dad's table manners and constantly be telling him off for speaking with his mouth full!
     
  9. tre

    tre Registered User

    Sep 23, 2008
    1,353
    Herts
    My husband is a very slow eater. Each meal takes between one and one and a half hours. He has to be fed. Until the last six months I could give him a biscuit or a sandwich to feed himself but now he only takes the first bite if I guide it to his mouth and then seems to lose the thread of what he is doing and just drop it.
    He chews each mouthful for ages. He has a problem with mixed textures. He does not need everything pureed but if I give him any yogurt other than smooth he rejects the bits. He will quite happily eat toast or a biscuit such as a kit kat though if I give it to him in small pieces.
    I found he was rejecting his dinner when it got cold so I have a staywarm plate which you fill with hot water which improves this. We see a neurological dietician and with her help and persistance we have got him from underweight to just within the normal range. I am anxious he does not get any less well padded as he is no longer very mobile and has purple patches where he sits which may progress to pressure sores.
    One helpful thing the dietician advised was not to mix his dinner all up but to offer vegetables etc separately as this is apparently more stimulus to the taste receptors.
    Before he got the dementia he had no problems eating or drinking but did not have a sweet tooth. Now this has changed and he likes sweet things. I even now put sugar in his tea to tempt him to drink it. He used to like beer but this now gives him an upset stomach but he still enjoys a glass of wine occasionally.
    Tre
     
  10. sleepless

    sleepless Registered User

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,232
    Female
    The Sweet North
    Tre, does he sit on a pressure-relieving cushion?
     
  11. tre

    tre Registered User

    Sep 23, 2008
    1,353
    Herts
    Yes, although we were promised a better gel one on 5th Oct and are still waiting.
    Tre
     

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