1. Shiela

    Shiela Registered User

    Mar 26, 2015
    20
    My husband is sleeping 12 hours a night and I'm having trouble getting him to get up, then dropping back to sleep within 30 minutes or so. Is this normal for someone with dementia. Are there any tips on encouraging him to get out of bed in the morning?
    Any advice would be welcome thank you
     
  2. tre

    tre Registered User

    Sep 23, 2008
    1,353
    Herts
    I do not have trouble getting him up but my husband has also started sleeping a lot during the day in the last couple of months. I have think this is probably dementia related .
    Tre
     
  3. pamann

    pamann Registered User

    Oct 28, 2013
    2,635
    Kent
    Hello Sheila, my hubby sleeps 10hrs but he is on sleeping pills, he was getting up most of the night, he does go back to bed after a shower, that makes him tired, is your hubby on any pills?
     
  4. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,838
    Suffolk
    OH can sleep 22 hours some days, if allowed. We took him to a care home for respite last Wednesday and he was asleep in a chair long before we left!
    I'm sure in his case it the dementia, he's not on any sleeping tablets, never has been.
     
  5. piph

    piph Registered User

    Feb 4, 2013
    1,530
    Northamptonshire
    I called the GP about my Mum sleeping a lot, and she told me that it's normal with dementia to have bouts of excessive sleeping - their poor brains work so hard just trying to get through the day, that eventually they just shut down and need to sleep for long periods. My Mum now spends at least half of most days in bed sleeping, only getting up in the afternoons, or sometimes not at all!
     
  6. Shiela

    Shiela Registered User

    Mar 26, 2015
    20
    thank you for your comments my husband is not on any sleeping pills and not on any different medication
     
  7. tre

    tre Registered User

    Sep 23, 2008
    1,353
    Herts
    neither is mine Sheila
    Tre
     
  8. piph

    piph Registered User

    Feb 4, 2013
    1,530
    Northamptonshire
    Nor mine.
     
  9. Roses40

    Roses40 Registered User

    Jan 25, 2015
    473
    manchester
    Nor my Dad. Must admit having burned out from sleep deprivation with Mam getting very little sleep am selfishly thankful to get a full nights sleep myself, Rose x
     
  10. Rashley

    Rashley Registered User

    Dec 21, 2014
    20
    Devon
    My OH goes to bed every day around 7 pm and stays in bed until I wake him up 12 hours later. After breakfast he usually starts napping. He has VD and excessive sleeping has got worse as his, dementia gets worse.
     
  11. Chuggalug

    Chuggalug Registered User

    Mar 24, 2014
    8,007
    Norfolk
    The first time my hubby spent the whole day and night in bed was frightening. However, I've now got used to his excessive sleeping patterns and use the time he's in bed to do other things. It means I can shop in safety, and do all the other jobs that need doing. Sleeping for longer periods I find is worse during the darker months. When hubby gets up around spring, he'll actually have a few hours in the afternoon/evening, sitting in his chair. Then, for the next two or three hours, it takes a while for him to settle. He'll get up a few times for a drink, etc., until he settles again for the rest of the night/next morning.
     
  12. mabbs

    mabbs Registered User

    Dec 1, 2014
    238
    Lancashire
    my OH nods off at the drop of a hat, he is staying up until 9.30 and gets up in the morning anytime between 5 and 8 o clock, mostly nearer 5, and then he nods off in a chair, problem is he sometimes wakes up very disorientated, and sometimes not in a good mood at all. Why is it I wonder that I can go to bed exhausted and yawning, and as soon as I get to bed, all I do is toss and turn, wish I could fall asleep as easily as Phil does.
     

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