Signing for LPA

cake4tea

Registered User
Jan 22, 2014
62
Hi

Our Mom has early stage Alzheimer's but can make decisions for herself, dress herself, wash herself etc. My sister and I are doing a lasting power of attorney for her, with her consent, but a friend has told me that Mom cannot sign it herself as she is diagnosed with Alzheimer's and wouldn't remember signing it later. it would therefore have to go through COP. Does anyone know if this is right?
 

sinkhole

Registered User
Jan 28, 2015
273
Hi

Our Mom has early stage Alzheimer's but can make decisions for herself, dress herself, wash herself etc. My sister and I are doing a lasting power of attorney for her, with her consent, but a friend has told me that Mom cannot sign it herself as she is diagnosed with Alzheimer's and wouldn't remember signing it later. it would therefore have to go through COP. Does anyone know if this is right?
As long as she still has mental capacity she can sign it. That's not the same as being diagnosed as having AD.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
19,691
North Manchester
A diagnosis of Alzheimer's in itself does not prevent a person making an LPA.

The overriding criterion is that at the time of signing the donor fully understands what they are doing and it's consequences. This level of capacity is judged by the Certificate Provider.
 
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LYN T

Registered User
Aug 30, 2012
6,962
Brixham Devon
When my OH was diagnosed officially he was already moderate/low severe with AD. He signed the LPA forms after a talk with the certificate provider who had been a close friend of Pete for nearly thirty years. He understood at the moment of signing. He wouldn't sign Welfare-only finance- so he was still capable of making his own choices

Take care

Lyn T