Should Mum have a Consultant Psychiatrist & CPN?

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by EllieS, Feb 23, 2007.

  1. EllieS

    EllieS Registered User

    Aug 23, 2005
    170
    SOMERSET
    Since Mum moved from residential Care home to the EMI dementia unit near to where I live she has not been allocated a Consultant Psychiatrist or CPN.

    Should she have been?

    Before she moved to this new area she had them and I can't really understand why she doesn't now!

    What do you think?

    EllieS
     
  2. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    Gosh sounds good to me , wish my mother could have one they don't do that in my area , not sure if they do when if she go in to a nurseing home .

    Count yourself lucky
     
  3. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    My mum has been in residential care for 2 years - one year in an EMI home and one year in a nursing home. She hasn't had either a psychiatrist or a CPN since she went into care. I don't know if there is a standard protocol for this but do sometimes get the impression that once someone is in residential care it can be difficult to get any outside intervention. It may also be that it varies from area to area.

    Do you feel that your mum would benefit from continuing to have a CPN and a psychiatist?
     
  4. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #4 Margarita, Feb 23, 2007
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2007
    Sorry to jump in ,but I was asking my social worker about getting a CPN and she said that only I can only get one , not for my mother so talk to the doctor about it .

    I wonder now if she was thinking alone those lines



    QUOTE]Do you feel that your mum would benefit from continuing to have a CPN and a psychiatist?[/QUOTE]
     
  5. Clive

    Clive Registered User

    Nov 7, 2004
    716
    My mum had help from a CPN for a year or so when she was living at home but when her Alzheimers got worse he said he could do nothing to help and stopped visiting. (He confided he had too many other people to look after). A year later her Aricept was stopped as her mini mental score was 12 and she had to go into an EMI home as she needed watching all day for her safety. She has not had a CPN since being in the EMI residential home.
     
  6. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,885
    Kent
    My mother, who died in 2002, only had a social worker. She was never seen by a psychiatrist, except one we paid to see, a consultant geriatric neurologist.
    My husband does have a psychiatrist and had one disastrous visit from a CPN, who he refuses to see again [apologies to other CPNs]
    So it looks as if it varies from area to area.
     
  7. Áine

    Áine Registered User

    Dad (and I) had joint assessment with psychiatrist and CPN. He went into permanent care shortly afterwards. The psychiatrist continued to be involved, usually at the request of the nh as opposed to him having regular out patient appointments. I think the CPN wasn't supposed to remain involved once he was in the nh, but I hung on to her for dear life ...... (because she was the person I found easiest to talk to about what was happening with dad) ....... and she was kind enough to let me hang on and gave lots of support.
     
  8. EllieS

    EllieS Registered User

    Aug 23, 2005
    170
    SOMERSET
    Mum probably doesn't need a Consultant and CPN but the point is that it's only because I am paying for her care that she's not having to call on their services - which goes against her claim for continuing care.

    Also, it would be good to have third parties involved in her care and not just trust the staff who are caring for her - would be someone other than me picking up in what could be important discrepancies!

    Just because we pay these people good money certainly does not mean our parents get their money's worth does it?

    And the fact is, in my case anyway, that I am somewhat reluctant to make any criticism for fear of the backlash on Mum!

    Everything's so difficult isn't it?

    Ellie
    x
     
  9. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    Although home fees are very expensive most of the staff are badly paid. I do understand your reluctance to make any criticism and I think it is one that is shared by many, whether their loved ones are in hospital or in residential care.
     
  10. Robbie

    Robbie Registered User

    Feb 22, 2007
    9
    East Yorkshire
    As an ex CPN I do appreciate how you feel. You build up a trust and rapport with the CPN and know that they will be objective as to the care your loved one, and their client, is receiving. However there is much emphasis on short term interventions for CPN's nowadays and they often carry large caseloads. As a consequence often when clients go into nh care they pull out when once they have settled. Most good homes have CPN contacts and can ask for help if it is required also CPN's are usually visiting some other residents for one reason or another and so visit fairly frequently. I was one of the old school who believed that once you were involved you continued to be up to the funeral and beyond if necessary. I didn't like the change of emphasis to brief interventions and so was glad to retire at 55yrs!

    Robbie
     
  11. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    I've never seen a CPN. I did ask about this at a recent meeting, and was told that they are only involved (in this area) in cases of 'challenging behaviour)'.
     
  12. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Lionel CPN continued to visit him went he went into a care home (self funded).

    As he went into a different county she said she would have to hand over to the new area. This had been quite long winded and I phoned to make sure it was under control......."oh no, will put plans in motion today. Was anything urgent?"

    I replied truthfully that I did not think so........famous last words. Lionels condition necessitated the home calling out the local doctor 3 times in as many days, phoned for CPN but was told old one signed off, new one not yet appointed.

    I have to admit the care home have been marvellous, supportive and are pushing the matter further.

    Lionel had been seeing the CPN at least once a month for the past 3 years.
    She had been with him through a lot of trauma. Once we settled him in the home it seems as though we were going to be on our own.

    (Sorry to rant, but things are not too good at present).
     
  13. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Connie

    Sorry to hear things are not to good. Rant if you want to. Can anyone help?

    Love and hugs,
     
  14. cynron

    cynron Registered User

    Sep 26, 2005
    429
    east sussex
    cpn

    When my husband was settled in his NH the cpn took him off his list.

    Cynron x x
     

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