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Sharing accommodation and care costs.

User

Registered User
Mar 23, 2015
25
What of this situation:

Full time care required. Could be agency -supplied.

Good-sized house. Invite (1? 2?) others into home to share care costs. FTC becomes affordable.

Comments? Ideas?
 
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Katrine

Registered User
Jan 20, 2011
2,839
England
The agency live-in carers that I use charge an extra 25% per day for an extra adult, but that would be someone not requiring care as such. This is when the client has a frail partner and the carer provides meals and does laundry for both of them. If two people require care then each needs a carer. Even one person needs more than one carer in the sense that carers need time off.

Unless the set up is providing care for a couple, you are effectively planning to set up a small CH. Imagine the red tape, training requirements, payroll, tax, inspections etc. You can't get round regulations, and neither should you, for the safety of the residents and the carers. It is not impossible to have a small CH with perhaps 5-10 residents, managed by an experienced person, but they still need additional staff to support them. Generally speaking, financial economies in care provision are easier to achieve in larger care homes rather than smaller ones.
 
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fizzie

Registered User
Jul 20, 2011
2,730
Here is some info from the CQC
http://www.cqc.org.uk/content/what-registration#accordion-1

It is complex. It doesn't really apply if people are sharing a house but other rules do as in HMOs (houses of multiple occupation) . I don't know what they are but they are complex

I wouldn't want to put off anyone thinking seriously about setting up a small care home as I personally believe that small care homes (good) win hands down on large care homes (good) but that is just my experience
 

User

Registered User
Mar 23, 2015
25
But this is not providing care, or setting up a care home. It is allowing an extra person or perhaps persons to live in a house where an external agency is the care provider. The CQC's information bears this out.
 

CollegeGirl

Registered User
Jan 19, 2011
9,524
North East England
My husband's aunty (my FiL's sister) went to live with my FiL and MiL a few years ago. There is/was no dementia involved, but aunty and FiL both have Parkinson's (aunty much further along than FiL) and MiL had had a stroke and had severe COPD (she has since died).

MiL qualified for personal care, and received this from social services. But the carers that came in were not supposed to do anything for the other two, despite their ill health.

If they'd needed care they would have had to qualify separately. The same carer/s could have provided this care, but would have had to stay for longer to provide it, and it would have been 'billed' separately. Eventually, this is what happened, as aunty needed care herself, too. (That didn't last too long, as MiL died and aunty decided to move into a home.)

I would imagine that if the people are paying for the care themselves then they could make whatever living and caring arrangements that they want, but that if the care is to be provided by social services then it would be more complicated, but surely not impossible.

I hope my limited experience has been of some help.
 

fizzie

Registered User
Jul 20, 2011
2,730
But this is not providing care, or setting up a care home. It is allowing an extra person or perhaps persons to live in a house where an external agency is the care provider. The CQC's information bears this out.
OK I understand that so the external agency would be subject to the CQC regulation, got it, but it would be a situation where unrelated people live in a house and presumambly pay rent etc to one person then don't other rules apply too? I don't know I just wondered
 

Pickles53

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
2,474
Radcliffe on Trent
OK I understand that so the external agency would be subject to the CQC regulation, got it, but it would be a situation where unrelated people live in a house and presumambly pay rent etc to one person then don't other rules apply too? I don't know I just wondered
I wonder if this could be done under the 'rent a room' scheme which allows a homeowner to rent out a room in their house to someone else?

https://www.gov.uk/rent-room-in-your-home

We did this for one of my daughter's friends, it worked very well. She rented a room with ensuite bathroom and had use of kitchen, living room etc.

I also did the same when I was working away from home and just rented a room in someone's house from Monday to Fridau.