1. Katy44

    Katy44 Registered User

    Sep 14, 2004
    134
    Does anyone have any experience of relatives being sectioned because of AD? (I'm guessing section 3 of the Mental Health Act). I've read about how long they can be held and whether they can be medicated, but I want to know - where are they held? (secure ward on a mental hospital?) How are they restrained? Are relatives allowed to visit? What is the usual outcome and how long will it take?
    As you may have guessed, they are saying this may be required for my Grandma. She has new tablets, but these are just tranquilizers, so they are unlikely to cause any major improvement
    Sorry if this post is upsetting for anyone but I really want to know what it would be like. This will be her worst nightmare.
     
  2. Anne54

    Anne54 Registered User

    Sep 16, 2004
    147
    Nottingham
    Dear Katy

    If you go to the 5th post on the tea room thread ‘Welcome new users’
    There is an interesting post on this subject.
    Hope this helps

    Anne
     
  3. Jude

    Jude Registered User

    Deear Katy,

    Sorry that I have no experience of this to offer. Hang in until somebody else can help out with your question here. There's always going to be an answer..,,


    Jude
     
  4. Kriss

    Kriss Registered User

    May 20, 2004
    513
    Shropshire
    Hi Katy

    Dad was sectioned for a while whilst in a specialist ward of our local cottage hospital - an escape from Colditz would have been childs play to him! We never saw any evidence of him having to be restrained forcefully but they were able to steer him back to the ward. Without the order they could not have even held his hand for fear of some stupid "law".

    There has to be a point where you weigh up the danger to them (and others) if they were to get out or do something silly. Talk it through with the specialist, if you're not happy to trust the staff then you need to address that first. Thankfully we had a really good relationship with ours and trusted them completely.

    It probably means taking different actions in different situations so ask them to explain it all to you.

    Kriss
     
  5. Sheila

    Sheila Registered User

    Oct 23, 2003
    2,259
    West Sussex
    Dear Katy, what Kriss says is similar to what I have heard. We don't seem to have a fact sheet on this one, I will ask if we can get one done. Why not ring the society helpline, they will I am sure know what the guide lines are. So sorry these things are happenning to you and your family, sending you a hug, love She. XX
     
  6. susan

    susan Registered User

    Aug 18, 2003
    125
    east sussex
    Dear Katy
    My dad was sectioned 4 1/2 years ago into our local hospital, but to a specialist unit for patients with AD. At the time we were as frightened as you sound but the staff were brilliant and we were allowed to visit whenever we wanted and in fact went every day for the year he was there, sadly dad's AD got alot worse and after the year was moved to a nursing home under section (i think 17).
    If your hospital has a similar unit there is nothing to fear - they bent over backwards to help dad and we couldn't have asked for more. The disadvantages are that it is not like home, even though he had his own room - that is partly why we fought to get funding for the nursing home. I will say we had to monitor the care in the nursing home more so than the hospital, but the environment was more homely and with home comforts of a lounge and room to take him out in a wheelchair.
    You need to talk to the specialist and get all the information as places vary so much.
    Thinking of you and if you want to ask anymore please do so, take care love Sue
     
  7. Katy44

    Katy44 Registered User

    Sep 14, 2004
    134
    Thanks everyone, especially Kriss and Susan.
    From what you've said it sounds like it wouldn't be too bad. Something does need to be done for both my grandparents sakes and if this is it then that's the way it has to be. I feel really upset for my Grandma though, as in her mind she's fine, and we're the ones who are all acting strangely.
    It may not even come to that, the CPN is back tomorrow to see how they are coping, and I think a decision will be made then. I'll let you all know, and thank you for your support and sharing stories that must have been upsetting. You have really helped.
     
  8. Doreen

    Doreen Registered User

    Dec 3, 2004
    50
    Oldham
    Hi Katy,

    On Tuesday this week, my husband went over the top and nothing would bring him down. He awoke in the morning in this violent mood, it was his day for thr hospital day centre, but he did not know that so I think his dreams ran into his awakening nd nothing would comfort him, when the ambulance arrived to take him to day care he tried the hit the ambulanceman, but eventually was transported to hospital day care, I rang them and warned them what to expect.
    I worried all day, and even more so when I received a call from a social worker who had been called to the day centre, unfortunayely for me and Jim there was no available bed, so he was sent home to me.

    About an hour after he arrived home the social worker arrived and asked if I wanted him sectioned. I was caught unawares and just replied I needed help. Over the next few hours she did get him a bed and then I was told if he left the house voluntary the police and the ambulance (who were waiting outside) could just take him, if he objected and stayed indoors the police couldn't interfere and we would have to have a doctor. Luckily he just walked out, he was taken to our local hospital to a ward for AD sufferers (above the day centre where he had been all day.) The staff are lovely and they are going to try and sort out his medication, but at the moment he is on anti psycotic drugs to keep him calm. He could be there for weeks but if they sort it out quickly he will come home with a care plan. If he had been sectioned, he would still be on the same ward but would not be allowed home for a month.

    Even though he has been aggressive on and off since being diagnosed, it was never like Tuesday and I feel inside that something happened in his brain that day, because even though he is one these drugs there is something different about him which I can't put my finger on.

    Doreen


    PS: Sheila good to have back hope you are OK
     
  9. Sheila

    Sheila Registered User

    Oct 23, 2003
    2,259
    West Sussex
    Dear Doreen how awful for you, but so glad things are now getting sorted out a bit for you. Love She. XX
     
  10. Katy44

    Katy44 Registered User

    Sep 14, 2004
    134
    Doreen I hope things are improving, let us know what is happening and take care of yourself. xx
     
  11. angela.robinson

    angela.robinson Registered User

    Dec 27, 2004
    520
    hi doreen .you are are both going through a tough time ,if you are happy with the way they are looking after him ,dont be in a hurry to bring him back home ,i know only to well how tempting that is ,take time out for yourself ,within a week of them being back ,you feel like you have never had a break.Thinking of you .ANGELA
     
  12. Doreen

    Doreen Registered User

    Dec 3, 2004
    50
    Oldham
    Thank you all for your best wishes, Jim was more his old self today thanks to the anti-psychotic drug, they are looking after him, but he is surrounded by patients who are a generation older than him. He had a good appetite but at the moment is not eating properly, it just breaks my heart to see him in those surroundings, I think it is going to be a hard few weeks before he comes home.

    Doreen
     
  13. lynz

    lynz Registered User

    Feb 16, 2005
    11
    west sussex
    Anyone know

    How bad do they have to be b4 it permanant ? and they dont get out! sorry to upset anyone!!!
     
  14. susan

    susan Registered User

    Aug 18, 2003
    125
    east sussex
    Dear Lynz
    This is a very dfficult thing to answer as each case is so individual, but in my case dad was detained because my mum was near breaking point with the threats, abuse, wandering and endless sleepless nights. He no longer saw mum as his wife, day in and day out and all he wanted was her out of the house and there was no way any of us could persuade him otherwise, or distract him.
    It was a very sad time in our lives, as he was so bad when he was admitted that the specialist warned us at the time he would be unlikely to come home. It was one of the hardest decisions we as a family have ever had to make, and still today although he has passed away the 'what if's ' still return.
    Sorry to be so blunt but there is no easy way to explain it all.
    All i can say is talk it through with the specialist and cpn and ask what ever you feel you need to.
    Take care Sue
     
  15. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hi Lynz

    yes, it is all case-by-case, because situations and conditions are so different. I think we probably know when the line has been crossed, though we hide that fact from ourselves for sometime after.

    I found one of the most difficult things about dementia care was/is the fact that younger patients like Jan are placed with people very much older. In truth, this only bothered her in the early stages, but for a partner, it breeds huge guilt at seeing their situation.

    Nowadays, the older patients at Jan's home are in many ways much younger than she appears to be, so things have evened out. Doesn't make it any easier though!

    Final thought - the music they play at the homes is a generation too old for her!

    We can only do our best.......
     
  16. Kriss

    Kriss Registered User

    May 20, 2004
    513
    Shropshire
    Hi Lynz

    My Dad was admitted to a specialist ward for respite and "to sort out his medication". While he was there he was sectioned due to his Escape antics. However he did settle again and the section was lifted. To us we saw no difference he continued to be be well cared for by some wonderful people and Mum visited every day and I most days. Sadly his physical health deteriorated rapidly and he passed away suddenly (maybe he gave up???) so we never got him home despite having very high hopes that it would be possible.

    Every one is different, we have no way of knowing what lies around the next bend though with this illness it can almost certainly be guaranteed as being uphill!

    Take each step at a time.

    Kriss
    x
     
  17. Katy44

    Katy44 Registered User

    Sep 14, 2004
    134
    Hi everyone,

    My Grandma is on a mixture of something and anti-psychotics, and they seem to be working, fingers crossed. On the first day she was on them she slept most of the day, and my Grandad felt awful, saying it was cruel. The CPN agreed that she seemed too heavily dosed, and suggested the dose be reduced the next day. The next day she had another episode! So she's back on them at full strength. On the bright side they are obviously working, but it is upsetting to realise how far she has declined and that there is no going back. I naively thought that there would be a solution that took her back to how she used to be but there isn't. At least she's no longer anxious and scared.
    I probably won't post for a week or so as I'm getting married on Saturday, but thank you all for your help and advice and take care of yourselves. xx
     
  18. Jude

    Jude Registered User

    Hey Katy....!

    Huge congratulations and best wishes for Saturday. I'll be thinking of you for sure - it's my mother's birthday.

    Jude xx
     
  19. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Katy, how wonderful. My very best wishes to you and your future husband for Saturday and the future. Connie
     
  20. thompsonsom

    thompsonsom Registered User

    Jul 4, 2004
    97
    halifax
    Congratulations

    Hi Katy

    All the best for your wedding on saturday, probably be a white one in more ways than 1.
    Have a lovely day.


    jan
     

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