Second new Poll

From time of admission to a care home, to the time unable to communicate effectively

  • less than two years [Early Onset patient i.e. patient under 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 2 40.0%
  • 3-4 years [Early Onset patient i.e. patient under 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • 5-6 years [Early Onset patient i.e. patient under 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • more than 6 years [Early Onset patient i.e. patient under 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Still able to communicate with speech [Early Onset patient i.e. patient under 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • less than two years [patient over 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 3-4 years [patient over 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • 5-6 years [patient over 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • more than 6 years [patient over 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Still able to communicate with speech [patient over 65 when signs began]

    Votes: 1 20.0%

  • Total voters
    5

Brucie

Registered User
Jan 31, 2004
12,413
near London
From time of admission to a care home

From time of admission to a care home, to the time unable to communicate effectively by speech.

This is a difficult one, for several reasons:
  • often people enter care homes at a very advanced stage because family have been caring for them effectively to that point, and speech may already have been compromised. It is important not to apportion the cause of the loss of communication to anything other than the developing condition of dementia.
  • communication by speech is a moving target because families and carers remodel their communication as the patient's speech becomes less effective. They may use a combination of speech and physical contact, for instance. It is often difficult to identify when communication becomes impossible by means of speech.