1. Lulu

    Lulu Registered User

    Nov 28, 2004
    391
    Just looking for opinions. I have been advised that as Mum isn't comfortable in the chair she sits in (she is mostly chair-bound) then it would be down to us to supply a replacement chair. I have begun to look at what is available.
    Given the nature of the disease and certain progression to needing hoists, transfers from bed to chair ect, I am caught between a 'normal' electric recliner (Mum still quite aware) in a vinyl/leather, or a more specialist proper nursing chair. Just wondered if anyone has ideas for consideration? Many thanks.
     
  2. Peirre

    Peirre Registered User

    Aug 26, 2015
    160
    After a recent OT assessment we've just had a "Morris adjustable chair raiser" fitted to dads original chair by the LA. This is an adjustable metal X frame, you pop out the castors from the bottom of the chair, and the frame has pegs that sit in the holes left by the castors. It has screw out feet to level, and also has adjustable legs that can be extended by 1" increments up to iirc 4"-8" higher. The Morris frame comes in various guises inc end frames to attach to a sofa, or chair without castors.
     
  3. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,478
    Ireland
    It's a difficult one. I was fortunate in that my husband's nursing home, when he suddenly lost his mobility and had lost a lot of weight, they had a spare what they called a "mobility chair" - like an electric recliner armchair on wheels - that they used for him. And although they should have used hoists, they had lots of male carers on staff, so they used to lift him gently, as it was easier on him. The home told me that relatives generally would buy the chairs when needed (although they would be supplied by our Health Service, the person could be waiting a few months for it - and often they didn't have a few months!)- and then the family donated the chair to the nursing home after the person's death, so the home had some to use when they were needed. And I in turn donated some equipment I had bought for my husband - helps keep everyone's costs down!

    I would talk to the staff/management at the home and ask their advice as to what they would think best for your mum. The advantage of the type of chair my husband was given was that it could be wheeled around the nursing home, and he was also able to be taken out into the garden for walks in it, although it was quite heavy. The fact that it could be wheeled around also meant less lifting and moving for him.
     
  4. BR_ANA

    BR_ANA Registered User

    Jun 27, 2012
    1,085
    Brazil
    My mum used a mini air mattress on a common recliner chair.


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  5. oilovlam

    oilovlam Registered User

    Aug 2, 2015
    388
    South East
    In hospital they use air 'cushions' in the chair but they look expensive. They are hooked up to a pump (the expensive bit I expect) that are also used to keep the air mattress pumped up in the bed.

    They were using these special air matresses because of broken hips & legs.

    Are pressure sores also a concern as they are chair bound?

    Second hand riser recliners are relatively cheap....but they are heavy and not easily moved around. Combining a standard riser recliner with some sort of 'special' cushion may be one solution.....although the cushion may need strapping in place else when the chair was raised the person may slide with the cushion onto the floor.
     
  6. BR_ANA

    BR_ANA Registered User

    Jun 27, 2012
    1,085
    Brazil
    My mum "cushion " was the simple one, no pump and no movement, just more comfort, regulated for her weight and tied to chair.


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     

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