1. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Registered User

    Sep 12, 2012
    22
    Has anyone else had this experience, my dad was taken into respite care as i was finding him very difficult to look after.

    Social Worker now says he is not able to come out as it is in his best interest to stay where he is as he is now emi nursing care, and a danger to me and himself. This being the case i assumed he was CHC the doctor and consultant also implied that he was CHC.

    Asked for CHC meeting and he did not get it, although most of the residents in the home that are the same level are getting CHC why!!!!

    There is no fairness in this system at all. We do not have the resources to pay for his care and will have to lose his house which my son is living in.

    Any thoughts

    Thanks very much
     
  2. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,475
    Radcliffe on Trent
    #2 Pickles53, Oct 26, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
    My only thought is to consider appealing the refusal of CHC if you haven't already done that. If you could share a bit more information about your Dad and how he was 'scored' there are a lot of other TPers who are very knowledgeable about CHC and might be able to help you.

    I know there a few circumstances where an individual's property can be excluded from financial assessments. Would your son meet any of these?

    AnnexB of the guidance (page 407) covers assessment of capital. See paragraph 34 - 44 'property disregard' and paragraph 45 on the 12-week disregard which may also apply.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploa.../file/366104/43380_23902777_Care_Act_Book.pdf

    If none of these apply, the house will probably need to be sold, though TBH I don't really see that the family are 'losing' the house. Your dad is just using his own funds to pay for something he really needs; that's what savings are for in the last analysis.
     
  3. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Registered User

    Sep 12, 2012
    22
    Reply

    thank you for your reply and link will look at link.

    Sorry i do disagree with your comment that house should be used my dad was old school and believed as a war vetran worked all his life and did think that the NHS was there to look after him surely it should be up to him whether he wants gives his house to the council.
     
  4. AlsoConfused

    AlsoConfused Registered User

    Sep 17, 2010
    1,953
    If your Dad's a danger to you and himself as the Social Worker implies then surely he'd score an A on the Behaviour rating on the CHC Checklist. That score alone would entitle him to go forward for full assessment for CHC care.

    You say his doctor and consultant also assumed he'd be accepted for CHC funding. If they did assume that then your Dad's case may well be better than we know. Only 15% applications for CHC funding succeed. Strongly suggest you read up the CHC thread put together by TP contributor stanley.

    You seem to feel your Dad's now been through the system and has been turned down. I wonder whether that's actually true ... you don't seem to have been involved or to have had a chance to see the documents, attend the meeting etc (all of which should have happened). The decision also seems to have been made suspiciously quickly (which isn't likely).

    I think you need to do a lot more digging just to find out what on earth has really happened. I suggest you start with your Dad's nursing home and / or the Social Worker.
     
  5. Saffie

    Saffie Registered User

    Mar 26, 2011
    22,498
    Female
    Near Southampton
    #5 Saffie, Oct 26, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
    The decision is not the consultant's to make I'm afraid.
    My husband's consultant also said that my husband would receive CHC funding and thus would be fully funded.
    He wasn't and he never received CHC funding despite having at the time recently lost his leg due to Peripheral Artery disease which also caused his Vascular dementia.

    Add diabetes and stage 3 kidney disease, fragile skin which made him liable to pressure sores, uable to weight bear due to gangrene on his remaining foot and MRSA in the amputation wound and you can see that he also had serious health issues unconnected to his severe dementia but very relevant to NHS treatment.

    The NHS is in dire straits so the bar is continually being raised and this varies from heath authority to health authority. So just because someone in one area has gained CHC funding, someone with similar health problems in another area might not be as fortunate.


    Pickles is right. If your son meets certain criteria then he might be able to remain in the house but in any case, the house would not be given to the council.
    The fees for the care home will have to be paid and if there is not enough of your father's income to pay them, then the house will have to be sold and the fees paid from the proceeds.
    Some councils will allow the sale to be postponed until the owner has died but this is by no means guaranteed.
     
  6. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,675
    North West
    I agree with Also Confused. You need to ask a lot of questions.

    My own knowledge of CHC is very limited but it was even more limited before I had to try and understand the process as my wife was assessed. My wife was successful but I'm aware that there is a lot of unfairness in the system and that there's a lot people need to know so I started the thread mentioned above by Also Confused. Members are, as I hoped, sharing their own knowledge and experience:

    http://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/showthread.php?86059-CHC-(Continuing-Healthcare)-support-thread
     
  7. djdhi

    djdhi Registered User

    Oct 26, 2015
    1
    strange behaviour

    I am a full-time carer for my wife, 76 yrs old. she has middle stage alzheimers I think.
    Last saturday she went into a kind of trance whilst standing up staring at nothing in particular in the corner of the room. It was 9.30 at night. I had no one to help, the only service that answered was 101, that gave general advice but no practical help. At 1 oclock I finally persuaded her to come to bed 3 and a half hours later. She did the same thing for 1 and a half hours this morning but this time my neighbour was able to help me manhandle her into a chair. Is this normal Altheimers behavior ?
    djdhi
     
  8. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,675
    North West
    #8 stanleypj, Oct 26, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2015
    Hello djghi, and welcome to TP. I'm sorry to hear about this new development and can understand that it must be worrying for you. Whilst it is hard to say that anything is 'normal' when it comes to Alzheimer's and we know that everybody is different I expect there will be other members who have had to deal with similar behaviour at some stage. It is possible for these thinks to go as quickly as they arrive but it would certainly be good to get an opinion from whoever is responsible for overseeing your wife's condition or, if no-one is, from your GP.

    I certainly went through a stage when I could not get my wife to come to bed but, fortunately, it did not last very long and now, three and a half years later, she is much calmer.
     
  9. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Registered User

    Sep 12, 2012
    22
    Thank you for your reply he did score a severe, but did not go through i am appealing, been involved all the way makes no sense.

    keep hoping for fair system thank you all for support
     
  10. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Registered User

    Sep 12, 2012
    22
    thank you for your reply did you manage to keep her home, i did not realize they can refuse to let you take them home.
     
  11. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,675
    North West
    Yes, there was no question of Sue being cared for anywhere else but at home. But there are no problems with challenging behaviour in our case and she is no danger to herself or anyone else.

    What reasons have you been given for your dad not being eligible for CHC funding?
     
  12. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Registered User

    Sep 12, 2012
    22
    one if the reasons was that his need are now being met in the nursing home and she stated that if his needs were being met he did not qualify.

    i promised him i would not put him in care
     
  13. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,675
    North West
    Oh dear! This seems to be a classic response - 'X's needs are being met so no CHC'. It's entirely at odds with what is supposed to happen. There's a saying you will often find quoted: 'A well-met need is still a need!' You could really do with trying to find someone locally who could support you in this.
     
  14. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,675
    North West
    And, of course, those other people that you mentioned who are in the same home and who have similar needs and have got CHC funding are, presumably also having their needs met. This clearly hasn't stopped them getting CHC.
     
  15. wonderwoman

    wonderwoman Registered User

    Sep 12, 2012
    22
    exactly, makes no sense at all. thank you for your support
     

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