Report - Psychiatric drugs such as haloperidol can slow down progression of dementia

Discussion in 'Researchers, students and professionals' started by CraigC, Oct 31, 2010.

  1. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
    http://www.skynews.com.au/health/article.aspx?id=532297&articleID=

    Well I've never been more confused. :confused:
    Looking forward to the alzheimer's soceity comment on this one.

    I know they are talking about mild doses but haloperidol can a be a very destructive drug. I've seen it in action.

     
  2. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
  3. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    16,093
    Toronto, Canada
    I've seen haloperidol in action also and it was grim.

    However, they are referring to frontotemporal dementia so perhaps that makes the difference.
     
  4. Browndr

    Browndr Registered User

    Jul 8, 2013
    1
    Haloperidol and FTD

    While Dr. John Kwok in Australia reports that haloperidol can be used to treat patients with frontotemporal dementia, numerous studies say it's contraindicated. The University of California at San Francisco, one of the leading FTD research institutions, recommends against it, as does the renown Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. If Kwok wants to swim upstream he should address how his research differs from prior work.
     
  5. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
    Hi Browndr,

    this is quite and old thread but still an interesting topic. As I said before my experience of haloperidol/dementia are very negative.

    I've just found a recent thead on the LBD Association forum warning about contradictions:

    http://community.lbda.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=3467

    Kind Regards
    Craig
     
  6. Carabosse

    Carabosse Registered User

    Jan 10, 2013
    1,694
    There needs to be a larger clinical trial on the effects of the drug on Dementia (all types not just frontotemporal lobe) and the body in general from long term use, rather than the small amount that was used for this research, its actually a wonder the publication published it on such numbers and yes the Dr needs to explain in more detail how and why his results differ from previous research.
     

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