Removing dentures

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
My mother has dementia. She doesn't understand me when I ask her to take her teeth out of her mouth. Does anyone have any tips how to get them out? She usually wants to bite on anything that goes between her teeth. I read a horror story where a senior woman's dentures became embedded in her mouth. It took 3 surgeons to remove them and the woman was too weak for anaesthetic. I need help!
 

jeany123

Registered User
Mar 24, 2012
19,036
70
Durham
Hello and welcome to Talking Point, the threads I have seen on here are about people not keeping their teeth in and taking them out and losing them. I am sorry I can't help but I hope there will be someone along soon with some ideas for you,

Best wishes, Jeany x
 

Saffie

Registered User
Mar 26, 2011
22,506
Near Southampton
We. that is the carers in the NH and I, had problems getting my husband's bottom part-plate in - but especially out - and he eventually had a bad fungal infection. The dentist then said that if it was difficult to get it out then not to put it in at all.

Hope that makes sense - even got myself confused!
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
Hello and welcome to Talking Point, the threads I have seen on here are about people not keeping their teeth in and taking them out and losing them. I am sorry I can't help but I hope there will be someone along soon with some ideas for you,

Best wishes, Jeany x
Hi Jeany,
Thank you for the welcome. I'm sure someone will have some ideas for me. I have spent a lot of time thinking about it, so I will try a couple other things.
denture daughter
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
I don't know-but I'm going to ask at my Husband's CH when I visit later-unless someone else comes along:)
LYN T,
My mother is also in a care home. They try every day to get her dentures out. I'm starting to think that when we get them out, they may have to stay out. But I would appreciate any ideas you find out. Thank you.
denturedaugter
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
I don't know-but I'm going to ask at my Husband's CH when I visit later-unless someone else comes along:)
LYN T,
My mother is also in a care home. They try every day to get her dentures out. I'm starting to think that when we get them out, they may have to stay out. But I would appreciate any ideas you find out. Thank you.
denturedaughter
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
We. that is the carers in the NH and I, had problems getting my husband's bottom part-plate in - but especially out - and he eventually had a bad fungal infection. The dentist then said that if it was difficult to get it out then not to put it in at all.

Hope that makes sense - even got myself confused!
Saffie,
Thank you for your post. My sisters and I have been discussing the idea of keeping her dentures out, once we get them out. If I can figure out a way, myself, to get them out, then I know I can do it again. I'm thinking about using some tongs and a facecloth. I just have to try harder.
denture daughter
 

mrsapple

Registered User
Feb 4, 2013
49
Northumberland
I'm in the same position with my mum - she won't let me or CH staff clean her teeth or take her partial denture out (lips clenched, arms flailing fighting us off etc). She has just had a bad case of oral thrush probably caused by the denture, which has not been out of her mouth for many months :eek:. I've asked the community dentist for help but had no response so far. My own dentist says he will try but only if community dentist can't/won't do it. I'll have to persevere as have read other posts which stress the importance of oral hygiene in dementia. If anyone has any tips I would appreciate it as well!!
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
I'm in the same position with my mum - she won't let me or CH staff clean her teeth or take her partial denture out (lips clenched, arms flailing fighting us off etc). She has just had a bad case of oral thrush probably caused by the denture, which has not been out of her mouth for many months :eek:. I've asked the community dentist for help but had no response so far. My own dentist says he will try but only if community dentist can't/won't do it. I'll have to persevere as have read other posts which stress the importance of oral hygiene in dementia. If anyone has any tips I would appreciate it as well!!
Mrsapple,
Thank you for your response. I also have read how important good dental hygiene is. What I have read is: Have the resident/person rinse with a mouthwash or water first. If your Mom is resistant to rinsing, just try it after she has had a good drink of anything. If the mouth area is wet, it is suppose to be easier to get the dentures out. Also, one website said to create chipmunk cheeks. So, I have to try this on my mother. Put a finger on each side of her top teeth and push her cheeks out some. It may help to break the seal on the denture. I will let you know how I make out. I will not see Mom until Tuesday. We are suppose to collect blood from her that day. hmmm, another fun event.
denturedaughter
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I'm just thinking about how I remove my own denture (an upper plate). You shouldn't need to put your fingers in any position where they can be bitten at least to release them: you slide your finger in between the cheek and the plate/gum line and then hook them down. Getting them out from that point might be a bit more fraught since they are then loose in the mouth.

If you've tried this, I apologise. It's just I'm wondering if when you don't have dentures, you may not realise the mechanics and that they are being held in place basically by suction and you have to release that pressure: I know I didn't.

Put a finger on each side of her top teeth and push her cheeks out some.
I actually disagree with this. I mean it might work but is quite uncomfortable for the person having it done to them and I think would cause more distress than necessary. Try one side first.
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
I'm just thinking about how I remove my own denture (an upper plate). You shouldn't need to put your fingers in any position where they can be bitten at least to release them: you slide your finger in between the cheek and the plate/gum line and then hook them down. Getting them out from that point might be a bit more fraught since they are then loose in the mouth.

If you've tried this, I apologise. It's just I'm wondering if when you don't have dentures, you may not realise the mechanics and that they are being held in place basically by suction and you have to release that pressure: I know I didn't.



I actually disagree with this. I mean it might work but is quite uncomfortable for the person having it done to them and I think would cause more distress than necessary. Try one side first.
Jenniferpa,
Thank you for your response. You are absolutely right. I don't have dentures, and don't quite understand the mechanics. I have had my fingers inside her mouth on each side of the top dentures, but I haven't felt the seam where the gum meets the dentures. I know I have to try harder. Time is always limited. She is not cooperative. I have brushed her teeth inside her mouth with a blend of water and mouthwash, but even that happens quickly. My sister and I will continue to try. I need to try one side first, also. Mom doesn't even use an adhesive. I guess I have to commend her denturist on a wonderful fit. I may call her denturist. She could probably give me some tips on how to remove the dentures.
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
You might have more space if you just try the one side method: I'm sitting here with my fingers in my mouth (well not while I'm typing of course :rolleyes:) and trying to release both sides at once actually tightens the cheeks on both sides and makes it harder to detect the seam.

How long have they been in there?
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
Jenniferpa,
Thanks Jennifer, I will try the one side at a time method. Well, I'll try everything I can think of. My sister was able to get Mom to take them out on Sept. 24th. Since then, I have brushed them a few times, when she cooperates. She always wants to bite down on the toothbrush so I don't get the insides of her teeth brushed.
denturedaughter
 

LYN T

Registered User
Aug 30, 2012
6,962
Brixham Devon
I'm just thinking about how I remove my own denture (an upper plate). You shouldn't need to put your fingers in any position where they can be bitten at least to release them: you slide your finger in between the cheek and the plate/gum line and then hook them down. Getting them out from that point might be a bit more fraught since they are then loose in the mouth.

If you've tried this, I apologise. It's just I'm wondering if when you don't have dentures, you may not realise the mechanics and that they are being held in place basically by suction and you have to release that pressure: I know I didn't.



I actually disagree with this. I mean it might work but is quite uncomfortable for the person having it done to them and I think would cause more distress than necessary. Try one side first.
Sorry for delay in getting back to you:(

I asked a carer at my Husband's CH-she said exactly the same as Jennifer. Finger between cheek and gum. Use a gentle, but firm hook action.

She said it was more difficult getting them back in but it's easier if you put the top ones in first. I've no idea why:confused:
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
Lyn T,
Thanks. I will try that. Usually she opens her lips, but not always her teeth. I just wish she would understand how good her teeth/dentures/mouth would feel after, then it would be easier. I appreciate everyone's responses. It gives me new hope and confidence to try again.
denturedaughter
 

Sue J

Registered User
Dec 9, 2009
8,035
Hi denture daughter

Just wonder if it may help to put a wooden spoon handle in her mouth to bite on when you try and release the teeth as suggested as clamping teeth together can't help to release the suction. It may also help you clean her teeth, maybe with a baby toothbrush if she is biting on a wooden spoon handle you may have a little space to get in.
Wishing you success
Best wishes
Sue
 

denturedaughter

Registered User
Oct 12, 2014
15
Canada
Sue J,
Those are good ideas: using a wooden spoon and a baby toothbrush. I will be trying them when I see Mom next time. I didn't realize there were baby toothbrushes. I will have to look for one in the drugstore. Thank you for your reply.
denturedaughter