registered social work

chip

Registered User
Jul 19, 2005
400
Scotland
With the way things are i have found this out. Who regulates health and social care professionals? Well in England its the General Social Care Council www.gscc.org.uk In Wales its the Care Council for Wales www.ccwales.org.uk In Scotland its the Scottish Social Services Council www.sssc.uk.com In Ireland its the Nothern Ireland Care Council www.niscc.info Social Workers have to be registered with the relevant regulator. If they are not registered and still practise they are breaking the law and maybe prosecuted. Registers are open to the public and you can check on site or by phone. Mine came up not registered and to phone them. So on Friday i'm going to ask her what her sssc number is. I found this out as been told she has done a lot wrong.
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
Who is your social worker actually employed by Chip? I would have thought that it would be mandatory for them to check that she was registered/qualified before actually employing her.

Recently qualified social workers would have completed a degree course as that is now the recognised route into social work. Prior to approximately 2003 there was a different course, a diploma or something of that nature.

I did consider training as a social worker myself and know I would have had to complete a 3 year degree.

Brenda
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
Could the social worker be a student?

As my daughter a student social worker , but still has to be registered under the social care Council to Voluntary work at a school as part of her socail work masters . that site only is for when they qualified , as I just ask my daughter.

So thats why I am wondering if your social worker a student and I can't find my mother SW on that site also .
 
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Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Our SW doesn't come up either, and as she's Senior SW for the Elderly, I can't believe she's not qualified.
 

chip

Registered User
Jul 19, 2005
400
Scotland
Maybe they don't want to be registered as they have standards. It does say only people who have shown that they meet our standards are allowed to register. I'm going to ask our one anyway and show advocacy it as well. It has taken a year to find i could have had a lot more help if she hadn't put so much conditions on the Direct Payments ( and was wrong ) I now have proof.
 

alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi All

My parent's social worker is registered, but I wouldn't say it makes her a better social worker.

Unfortunately, she needs pushed and always has to consult her team leader, no matter what.

Does registration make them better at the the service they provide, make them more experienced?

As I have said before on this forum, social workers should not be thrown in at the deep end. There should be proper training and an apprenticeship, by shadowing someone more experienced for a set period of time, maybe then service users can expect better service.

After all, at the end of the day social services is a service company and they are there to provide a service, even if they don't think so!!

Alfjess
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
Chip

http://www.disabilityalliance.org/index.htm

As my daughter is studying to be a social worker she had to get this book disability rights handbook 2006/7 new one is out on April for 2007/8 she just told me as the book run from every April - April to cover the changeing laws on disability rights

she just given me the web site, that on the book , because I have seen that it does cover about direct payment, she has to keep the book with her at the moment and take it with her every day because she has to revise a lot from it every day for her exams, so she won’t lend it to me in case I forget to give her it back , which I have done in the past :rolleyes:

it does cover your right for direct payments in England and Scotland so may be of help , Marie my daughter says just type the name of the book and you can buy it on the internet, as we was trying to look for direct payments law on that site , may be you can find it . hope its of some help for back -up when you talk to SW



PS

There should be proper training and an apprenticeship, by shadowing someone more experienced for a set period of time, maybe then service users can expect better service

That what my daughter was doing shadowing a SW , now she in a school doing social work experience , but not shadowing now , as every school in England now has to have a social worker she does this alone side studying at university for her master in social work

you can not do apprenticeship as you now need Degrees you train as you do the degrees/ masters and then on to masters if you want , if you have not done 3 year degree in SW , like my daughter done 3 years degree in sociology now 2 years master in SW
 
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noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
alfjess said:
As I have said before on this forum, social workers should not be thrown in at the deep end. There should be proper training and an apprenticeship, by shadowing someone more experienced for a set period of time, maybe then service users can expect better service.
Alfjess
I know that the new 3 year degree does involve 200 hours of practical placements. I don't know enough about the diploma which preceded it (and which most qualified social workers will have, as the degree is only about 3 or 4 years old) to be able to make a comment.

Brenda
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
I don't know enough about the diploma which preceded it
a diploma does not preceded it, you can not do a diploma anymore in England to became a SW it has to be a

3 year degree in SW then a master if you want to go higher in the field of social work, which really mean you can be a higher earner .

A diploma is a Certificate e.g. a peace of paper that say's you have successfully completed the course were as a degree is a qualification that gives you a grade so you can work in that particular field e.g. a degree in nursing gives you the opportunity to become a nurse.

you have to have a degree or a maters degree to become a socail worker you dont do dipoma's only in other country's you might be confusing the words ( Or how the old system was )
 
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alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi All

Obviously. I am out of touch, but it appears to me that, maybe my experience with social workers, concerning Mum and Dad, both in Glasgow and in South
Lanarkshire has been with inexperienced social workers, who always have to go higher, to obtain an answer and that takes more time.

I am all for education, but like everything else, Is fast tracking the best way?

Only my old fashioned opinion

This is a question from someone who's husband is an international training consultant and would argue with me against apprenticeships, versus competency

My Daughter is also a training consultant (Accelerated learning) so in the family I am outvoted, but I still think nothing can beat experience

Alfjess
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
I am all for education, but like everything else, Is fast tracking the best way?
what is fast tracking ?






but I still think nothing can beat experience

Well your going to get that in the future with SW, because my daughter is 22 working in a school Monday- Friday unpaid , and on school holiday they still work , they catch up with written work

Her friends have placements in other area of social work all unpaid, while studying.

I ask all her friend's what line of SW are they doing none so far have said for the elderly
 
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Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
Margarita said:
a diploma does not preceded it,


you have to have a degree or a maters degree to become a socail worker you dont do dipoma's only in other country's you might be confusing the words ( Or how the old system was )

No, Margarita, it's you who are confusing the words.

What Brenda was saying was that the degree course was only introduced three or four years ago, and before that the only qualification needed was a diploma. Therefore some of the older SWs will only have a diploma, not a degree.

What Alfjess is saying is that that does not make them inferior, their experience is worth more than a piece of paper.
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
yes that why I said
you have to have a degree or a maters degree to become a socail worker you dont do dipoma's only in other country's you might be confusing the word
( Or how the old system was )

Thanks for clearing that up .

What Alfjess is saying is that that does not make them inferior, their experience is worth more than a piece of paper

I don’t know about that , as that could be argued as in the state of how the SW are in how . that they needed to change the system, to how hard it take to became a nurse as having to do a degree, so putting social worker on the same level as nurses having to do a degree .

Not geting in from the back door in just haveing to do a dipoma
 
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alfjess

Registered User
Jul 10, 2006
1,213
south lanarkshire
Hi Hazel

Yes, I believe experience is everything,

Young people have to gain experience, BUT too many, in many careers have been fast tracked. (My husband wouldn't agree, After all he has to pass them as competant, they tick all the boxes) By the way my husband and I get on very well, only in this do we disagree, but then I may be old fashioned.

Margueritta
eg. Midwifes go to University now. I have no doubt they have to have, practical experience before they are let lose on expectant mothers, but I still believe that hands on practical experiences, whether it is bricklaying, motor mechanic, social worker or whatever is invaluable. That is not to say that your daughter won't become a brilliant social worker, she has had a headstart in understanding with your Mother and Brother

To quote Brucie, This is only my humble opinion

Alfjess
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
To quote Brucie, This is only my humble opinion
I know like mine :)

I would of love to became a SW from my Life
Experience , just for the ederly but they change the law , and it does make me wonder why , when you read how so many SW have made so many mistakes , but then don’t we all , what would we say if a Midwifes got it wrong . they don't do they ?

And then the verbal abuse they get when they get it wrong , I don’t know if it’s a job I would really want my daughter to go into now , with the story I hear , but it was her choice
 
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Lila13

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
1,342
I'm sure midwives sometimes make mistakes (as everyone does), and if it's proved then the NHS has to pay.
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
Margarita said:
a diploma does not preceded it, you can not do a diploma anymore in England to became a SW it has to be a

3 year degree in SW then a master if you want to go higher in the field of social work, which really mean you can be a higher earner .

A diploma is a Certificate e.g. a peace of paper that say's you have successfully completed the course were as a degree is a qualification that gives you a grade so you can work in that particular field e.g. a degree in nursing gives you the opportunity to become a nurse.

you have to have a degree or a maters degree to become a socail worker you dont do dipoma's only in other country's you might be confusing the words ( Or how the old system was )
The diploma in social work did precede the degree.The social work degree only started in about 2003. Prior to that the route to qualify as a social worker was through a Diploma. Anyone who qualified prior to the degree being available is a qualified social worker. They do not need to take the degree if they already have the diploma. You can no longer study for the diploma as the degree is now the only route (or a Masters for someone who already has a degree in another subject.)

So you can be a qualified social worker with a diploma, with a degree or with a masters. It all depends on when it was studied.

What is the current qualification for social work?
Since September 2003 there is a new degree in social work, which will usually take three years to complete and be a vocational qualification. The 'old' qualification the Diploma in Social Work (DipSW) will still be a recognised qualification.


http://www.socialworkandcare.co.uk/socialwork/qa/train.asp?qn=1


Brenda
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
Margarita said:
Not geting in from the back door in just haveing to do a dipoma
I think the diploma took 2 years so wouldn't really class it as 'just' having to do a diploma. It may also be that there was more practical work than academic, which some would say is a good thing. However, as I said I know a little bit about the degree but not very much about the diploma so don't know much about the differences between the two.

Brenda
 

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