Recovery after General Anaesthetic

Discussion in 'Middle - later stages of dementia' started by miss madam, Jun 3, 2017.

  1. miss madam

    miss madam Registered User

    Jan 10, 2016
    14
    Hi

    Father fell in hospital, broke part of his prosthetic hip, he was then left in traction for 5 days until they could fit him in for surgery! Since coming round from the op, he has been unresponsive to sounds/voices, he is reacting to pain, mainly by groaning or grimacing. Before the op, he didn't speak much but would look at you if you spoke, has anyone gone through this, was it temporary or are we looking at him being like this permanently.

    Thanks
     
  2. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,570
    Merseyside
    Anaesthetic + dementia + pain can be a nightmare. As the anaesthetic & pain lessen fingers crossed you see an improvement.
     
  3. nmintueo

    nmintueo Registered User

    Jun 28, 2011
    847
    UK
    You don't say how long it's been since the operation, or whether the doctors dealing with your father have given you any information (I would say they should). Absent any other information, I think it's reasonable to say that most people will improve.

    See e.g. previous thread Anesthestic worries with personal accounts, and information from the Royal College of Anaesthetists:

    Risks associated with your anaesthetic
    Section 7: Becoming confused after an operation

    http://www.rcoa.ac.uk/system/files/07-Confused2017.pdf

    Symptoms vary a lot in different people. Some people become agitated and confused. Others become quiet and withdrawn.

    Who is at risk of developing delirium?
    Some people are more likely to develop delirium. This includes people with:
    ■ previous dementia or brain disorders
    ■ advanced age

    Does delirium improve and go away?
    Most people who develop delirium are treated for any identified causes and improve greatly. However, they are more likely to stay in hospital days or weeks longer than people who do not become confused. There is a slightly increased risk that people who have had severe delirium will end up living in a more supported environment, less independently, than before.​
     

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