1. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    Was reading this


    NR1/2D receptors may be the least-studied of the major NMDA receptor subtypes, but there is increasing evidence that they play important roles in the brain, including the process of long-term depression (which, like long-term potentiation, is thought to be essential for learning and memory) and disease.


    A better understanding of how NMDA receptors work could lead to better treatments for schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke.



    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061023192251.htm
     
  2. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Oh heck Margarita: I have decided in my next life I shall study the brain, how it works, and NMDA - we may have more support by then!!

    Love Jan
     
  3. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    hopefully in Our next life , Science has found the Cure for Alzheimer's , because at the rate they going now, it won't happen in Our generation.

    All could it be they need more funding !
     
  4. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,659
    Kent
    Or could it be there is still not enough understanding of the brain and how it functions.
     
  5. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #5 Margarita, Jan 30, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2008
    Does say above that


    NR1/2D receptors may be the least-studied of the major NMDA receptor subtypes, but there is increasing evidence that they play important roles in the brain, including the process of long-term depression (which, like long-term potentiation, is thought to be essential for learning and memory) and disease.

    So they is an understanding of the brain and its functions , as they is increasing evidence that they play important roles in the brain, including the process of long-term depression (which, like long-term potentiation, is thought to be essential for learning and memory) and disease.

    Just like to add :) Whether the human brain can understand itself is one of the oldest philosophical questions :D
     
  6. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #6 Margarita, Jan 30, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2008
    I just found this

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2005/1210-detecting_alzheimers_early.htm

    Then if you want listen to Video to what the woman say at the end of it , compared to what are government think about giving treatment early has just left me in Shock .

    America seem so advice in they research in AZ that was way back in 05

    Where they getting they money from must be from Government.
     
  7. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #7 Margarita, Jan 30, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2008
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2006/0303-predicting_alzheimers.htm

     

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