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recently diagnosed

Quilty

Registered User
Aug 28, 2014
1,051
GLASGOW
Welcome to talking point. Its easy to say but try not to panic. Take it as it comes. Obe thing we have all learned is that no two people have the same pattern of illness.
 

LynneMcV

Volunteer Moderator
May 9, 2012
3,944
south-east London
Welcome to Talking Point :)

I understand some of what you are experiencing at this early stage of diagnosis. My husband was also diagnosed at 58. It is a lot to take on board so take the time you need and ask the questions you have as and when they raise their heads.

The one thing I will say at this point is that things will not change overnight. We are nearly four years post diagnosis now and my husband still does many of the things he always did, even if in a slightly different way :)

Yes, things are different but the key, we have found, is to concentrate on what we can do rather than waste time and energy on what can't be done.

You will find many people here who can give the help, advice and support you need - it's also great as a place to chat and relax among friends.
 

raptorman1957

Registered User
Jan 5, 2016
14
manchester
Thanks for the replys at the moment im just coming to terms with my diagnosis has a person who always had a plan its bushwacked me a little but i do intend to live with it and if possible live well. Your advice to do what you can and dont worry about what you cant seems good advice . So i may pop up on here has and when i feel the need good to know im not on my own with this.
 

1mindy

Registered User
Jul 21, 2015
539
Shropshire
Living with a partner who gave up,post diagnosis became angry with everyone and tried his best to isolate himself,not telling anyone. I know you must be in termoil,but dont push people awaystay positive and carry on doing what you can .If you struggle tell people ,they will then understand more. But accept help as you go along. Our life and family relationship could have continued without much changing ,for years,but his anger ,fear,call it what you want consumed and continues to consume his everywaking hour.
 

Irishgirl57

Registered User
Jan 21, 2014
189
62
Florida, USA
I wish I wasn't welcome you to the site. I was diagnosed at 53, I think. I remember the diagnosis of cognitive dementia.? How was that so? How could that be ? Even after all the testing, and more testing to figure out the cognitive areas I needed help, I sat with the counselor one day and said and my ever going to be the same again, and she said no. I needed to find my new normal.

The new normal, was acceptance for me. If I did not accept my condition, I could not move on. I could not find out the things that I could do, because I was so busy fighting with myself about the things that I couldn't do ....

I have come back to this website after being absent for a little while. Being back feels like Coming home.

I wish you well on your new journey... Don't be to hard on yourself!
 

Trixxie

Registered User
Oct 3, 2014
51
Midsomer Norton near Bath
My hubby was diagnosed at the age of 54 with Alzheimer's but it was no surprise to me, I knew something was wrong, he dealt with the diagnosis really well and we're not a shy couple so lots of friends knew right at the beginning and have been amazing! Here we are 16 month on and yes things have changed a little and I've had to learn to be patient and understanding and not keep asking 'what are you looking for' while he opens 6 cupboards in the kitchen looking for a biscuit tin that's never been moved! You know what I mean!! As people have said before things won't change overnight, you need to focus on what you CAN do rather than what you CAN'T do. Take each day as it comes & cherish loved ones. Take care and everyone is here to chat anytime!


Sent from my iPad using Talking Point
 

kingybell

Registered User
Feb 3, 2015
115
There's some great people on here who have lived with dementia over 10years. They appear to be still of good mind and living healthily.

I would say do tell people as it raises awareness and you won't ever be alone as long as people know and understand.

Enjoy your life and do all the things you want to do!