1. Q&A: Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) - Thursday 27 Sept, 3-4pm

    Power of attorney (LPA) is a legal tool that gives another adult - often a carer or family member - the legal authority to make decisions on behalf of someone with dementia, if they become unable to themselves.

    Our next expert Q&A will be hosted by Flora and Helen from our Knowledge Services team. They will be answering your questions on LPA on Thursday 27 September from 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Query Re Care Home Charges

Discussion in 'Legal and financial issues' started by jonl, Sep 6, 2018.

  1. jonl

    jonl New member

    Sep 6, 2018
    2
    I may well be asking long after the horse has bolted from the stable as my mother went into care two years ago but my question is prompted by my finding a letter from that time from the local NHS Continuing Care Team denying an application for Continuing Health Care.

    My mother was placed into care by the local social services as she was deemed a risk to herself and others if she was to stay in her own home with her advancing dementia and since that time has been funding her residence costs from her own savings (via myself acting with POA).

    However as she was placed there against her will by social services rather than this being a voluntary decision is it correct that she has to pay all her own fees or is there/should there be assistance available?
     
  2. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    10,464
    Female
    London
    I'm afraid it's nothing to do with her being "placed against her will". Most people are, because who loves going into a care home? If a best interest decision concluded she had to for her own safety, then that is that. Most CHC applications are denied, and then it's down to the individual's financial circumstances.
     
  3. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    6,415
    Yorkshire
    hi @Joni
    and welcome to TP
    however a person arrives to move into a care home, if they have savings above £23250 (and do not qualify for CHC payments, and very few do) they will have to pay their own care home fees from income and savings
    just check that your mother is receiving Attendance Allowance at the higher rate as those who self-fund keep this benefit
     
  4. jonl

    jonl New member

    Sep 6, 2018
    2
    Thanks for the responses, just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing a trick.

    My mother was/is in receipt of disability living allowance due to long term mobility problems, is attendance allowance something that can be taken alongside this?
     
  5. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    6,956
    Female
    South coast
    Unfortunately not.
    DLA is given to people who are not receiving state pension (its now been changed to PIP) and it then continues once they reach retirement. Attendance Allowance is given to people who are already receiving state pension. You cant get both.
     

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