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Promising book on dementia prevention

Countryboy

Registered User
Mar 17, 2005
1,681
0
South West
As long as people continue to try, there is hope. Imagine if everyone gave up.

Hi Grannie G yes every one has to deal with this in their own way, I took the view I have the dementia and it in my interest to first accept it then lean how to cope with it ok can be a few challenges but i found that kept my brain active again not easy but can be achieved.

still bitterly cold out walking Grannie G no sign of Global Warming down "er" :(:(
 

Georgina63

Registered User
Aug 11, 2014
973
0
I have read a book called 'The End of Alzheimers' by Dr Dale Bredesen who is a Professor of Neurology in California. The book explains why there is no cure for dementia and, I'm afraid to say, unlikely to be one. However, it has a protocol of treatment strategies - tailored to the individual, which have had very positive results on patients where he works. The strategies are not straightforward and not fully achievable in the UK without the aid of an unconventionally trained GP (a functional doctor).

But the message is based on looking at your diet, exercise, sleep patterns, baseline blood chemistry, your genes etc - on the basis that a lot of dementias (and other diseases) stem from an inflammatory response which the body is trying to protect itself from, but doing it badly. So, remove or reduce the sources of inflammation and the brain will respond. And starting treatment or prevention as early as possible is also the message.

There are certain things we can all do without medical tests and the book is definitely worth reading just to find out more about dementia itself.

Hi @lambchop, I found it a really interesting read and just a little bit reassuring that there might be some sort of solution. Yes, it's complex and tailored to each individual case, but there in lies the challenge around the expectation that there may one day be 'a single pill' that will be a cure......Gx
 

Georgina63

Registered User
Aug 11, 2014
973
0
It's sad to hear someone describe my enthusiasm as 'misguided'.

Yes, I am enthuastic about this book, and no-one's hopes should be unduly raised, but, as a former carer, I am keen to find ways to try and prevent dementia in myself as well as trying to help others, which is understandably the reason behind me posting about this book in the first place.

There have been recent posts here about cannabis use for dementia which shows people are desperate for help.

Ultimately, it is just a book, not a drug, so it won't do anyone harm to read it, if they wish to; it's just a choice, which I was trying to highlight - no-one is being forced to buy it and forum users can make their own minds up. Even if anyone thinks my enthuasiasm is unwarranted, I don't feel discouragement is fair either.

I agree with you @lambchop - we can each make our own decisions about what to read and which advice to follow, and if this provides even a glimmer of hope then that's got to be a positive thing, especially if there is little alternative. Some of the programme re exercise and nutrition is very common sense and even if in the long run it didn't work work to prevent Alzheimer's, well, no harm done! I must admit as I read the book, I was often thinking about what might have affected my parents, both of whom have Alzheimer's/dementia, but of course we may never know! Georgina X
 

lambchop

Registered User
Nov 18, 2011
112
0
Many thanks Georgina. Like you, I agree it's a positive sign for the future. :) xx
 
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lambchop

Registered User
Nov 18, 2011
112
0
I read Dr Bredesen book - he is not a charlatan but a highly qualified Head of Neurology in San Francisco. His approach is one of 21st cenrury Medicen - like what is currently happening in individualized chemotherapy cancer treatment . No longer one size fits all . The reason his protocol is not more broadly known as yet is down to lack of $$$$ making potential for drug companies . The ‘ cure ‘ for Alzheimer’s is a Trillion dollar goldmine - and drug companies want a simple drug based solution - which looks highly unlikely given the complicated brain science.

Hear, hear. Thanks Country Lady.
 

Country lady

Registered User
Dec 5, 2017
18
0
[I have started parts of the protocol for my husband. On recent blood tests, his pattern fits the common Sugar too high/ Homocysteine/ too high profile. We have changed to the High Fat/ Low Carb diet, and are finding it easy enough, despite the lack of bread/ grains/ pasta/ potatoes. I have seen and heard of Diabetic patients reversing their Diabetes on this diet + exercise alone, so am hopeful that we can achieve something - hopefully stall the progress of his Dementia. We are seeing a Practitioner trained in the Bredesen Protocol next week, and hopefully will be starting on a Supplement programme as well. I was wondering if you have heard of anyone else who is trying the Protocol and if so, have they reported any changes/ improvements ?
 

idedwards

New member
Mar 22, 2019
5
0
[I have started parts of the protocol for my husband. On recent blood tests, his pattern fits the common Sugar too high/ Homocysteine/ too high profile. We have changed to the High Fat/ Low Carb diet, and are finding it easy enough, despite the lack of bread/ grains/ pasta/ potatoes. I have seen and heard of Diabetic patients reversing their Diabetes on this diet + exercise alone, so am hopeful that we can achieve something - hopefully stall the progress of his Dementia. We are seeing a Practitioner trained in the Bredesen Protocol next week, and hopefully will be starting on a Supplement programme as well. I was wondering if you have heard of anyone else who is trying the Protocol and if so, have they reported any changes/ improvements ?

How have you got on after 8-9 months or so? I cannot get support for a change of diet for my wife in her care home. The health professionals I have spoken to want to control things according to their orthodox teachings and have little or no appetite to consider Dr Bredesen's research and my wishes for my wife to switch from a sugar and high carb diet to a Ketogenic no sugar, low carb/high fat diet.
 
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idedwards

New member
Mar 22, 2019
5
0
Dr Bredesen ReCODE programme in the UK.
Has anyone experience of this dementia recovery programme for their loved on in the UK? I am working with dietitians to operate the programme for my wife who has Alzheimers and is in a care home. The trouble is I cannot persuade the care home to operate a Keto friendly diet for my wife and the experts at the Mental Health Team are all dismissive of the protocol. Does anyone know of any 'ReCODE Friendly' care homes or health practitioners in the UK I can try to get on my side and re-approach the care home management and local Mental Health Team.
 
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Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
76,059
0
Kent
Hello @idedwards

I`m not surprised you are unable to find any ReCODE friendly care homes. All these new theories are experimental and no care home would dare take the risk of trying out new practices on their residents, especially in the litigious society we now live in.
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,826
0
Victoria, Australia
Hello @idedwards

I`m not surprised you are unable to find any ReCODE friendly care homes. All these new theories are experimental and no care home would dare take the risk of trying out new practices on their residents, especially in the litigious society we now live in.
And from what I understand of this program is that I am sure any care home would need to employ extra staff to make sure that everything was done to requirements. I understand that each person has their own specialized program so apart from the increased costs of the supplements, I can't see care homes investing in the extra staff to implement it. Then there is also the issue of monitoring the program and the absolute imperative of measuring and recording the results. And of course, care homes would be required to make sure that the relevant staff are trained appropriately and updated as things change.
 

Joe123

New member
Apr 11, 2019
1
0
Hi all,

My Dad has recently been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimers and my friend recommended the Dr Bredesen 'The End of Alzheimers' book. I have started reading it and am considering getting my Dad on to the Recode Protocol, or a version of it - a mild keto diet, more exercise, structured sleep and frequent saunas (I read about a trial in Finland that suggested saunas can help prevent dementia.) My thought is that even if these changes do nothing to help reverse Alzheimers symptoms my Dad may feel more healthy which is a win in itself.

I am wary of contacting a Recode practitioner and getting fully onboard as they seem rather expensive for a largely unproven treatment.

Has anyone given the protocol or a version of it a go? I saw a post from Country Lady a while back but nothing since. I would be keen to hear others thoughts or experiences. I am also happy to provide updates on how my Dad gets on if anyone is interested.

Joe
 

AliceA

Registered User
May 27, 2016
2,914
0
You may be interested in the Preventing Dementia Course starting on May the 3rd from the University of Tasmania. Those of us on here who have done the Understanding Dementia have found that course very valuable. I have enroled for the May one too.

I do not know about the Recode myself, I have been interested in natural health and from my experience everything seems to work for somebody but nothing works for everyone.
I do believe in some cases one can slow a disease but there are complex factors in this.
This was touched on in the Understanding Dementia course,
I do know that my Swedish friend with a sauna in his house, continued with cross country skiing and long night walks in the summer, majored on a fish diet still had dementia at the end of life, his wife equally fit died of cancer quite young. Both brimmed with health but have died long before us. My husband, as many on here say their loved one had been, was also very fit and active.

We had a sauna in a previous house, the infrared ones at said to be good, certainly cheaper. A fit life style will help a feeling of wellbeing as long as there is no pressure. Your input into one to one involvement will help a lot.
Do not let me put you off in anyway, sometime the feeling we are doing something really helps a positive environment. Sleep is paramount for everyone. You may be able gently make adjustments without breaking the bank.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
3,198
0
High Peak
I think the major flaw with the Bredesen protocol is that it requires acceptance/co-operation/compliance from the PWD

I can imagine the reaction from my mother if I put her on a keto diet - we're lucky if she eats anything. And saunas? Really?? Sorry but I think that's just rubbish. I can't imagine the CH staff telling mum to stick to a strict sleeping regime either, not when she's wandering at night and doesn't have a clue what time it is. None of these things would help my mum but they would certainly get her pretty annoyed.

No. Just no.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,448
0
South coast
If you read back on this and similar threads you will see that there are a few newbies who come on and say it is wonderful and how its improved their PWD no end, but they never post again and I (cynically) wonder whether its really true or whether its just advertisement! Then you get other people like yourself, Joe, who are obviously genuine say that they are going to give it a try and come back and let us know whether it works. They may come back, once , after a couple of months and say its going fine, but there has never been anyone come back long-term and report any improvement and most people never come back at all. Cynically, I suspect this is because it simply doesnt work.

I dont see any reason not to give a keto diet a go and try the other things, but dont spend a lot of money on it.
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,826
0
Victoria, Australia
If you read back on this and similar threads you will see that there are a few newbies who come on and say it is wonderful and how its improved their PWD no end, but they never post again and I (cynically) wonder whether its really true or whether its just advertisement! Then you get other people like yourself, Joe, who are obviously genuine say that they are going to give it a try and come back and let us know whether it works. They may come back, once , after a couple of months and say its going fine, but there has never been anyone come back long-term and report any improvement and most people never come back at all. Cynically, I suspect this is because it simply doesnt work.

I dont see any reason not to give a keto diet a go and try the other things, but dont spend a lot of money on it.
I am always struck by how how there never seems to be a commonality about who develops Alzheimer's and who doesn't. My husband has been a vegetarian for donkeys years, never smoked and as a younger man was very fit and active (ran marathons, played football, tennis etc). He enjoyed alcohol but hasn't had a drink for years, never used drugs and has always maintained a healthy weight. He has suffered heart trouble for about 16 years including a cardiac arrest 5 1/2 years ago followed by AD 5 years ago.if you follow the guidelines he should never have developed either. But his mother had Alzheimer's though much worse than he does.

My point is that he did everything to be healthy and yet it didn't stop him from developing both heart failure and Alzheimer's. Other people do everything wrong and some get it and some don't. Do you ever get the feeling that any program that's going to work, has to be mind blowing in its complexity.

I asked my husband's consultant about it and he felt that if anybody wanted to try it, feel free to do so but he had never seen anything to prove that it worked. I would love to hear confirmation that it worked but remain unconvinced as yet.
 

AliceA

Registered User
May 27, 2016
2,914
0
I think often there is a placebo effect with the first enthusiasm but then the body overcomes it in the long run.
 

serenedreme

New member
Apr 7, 2019
6
0
Hi all,

My Dad has recently been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimers and my friend recommended the Dr Bredesen 'The End of Alzheimers' book. I have started reading it and am considering getting my Dad on to the Recode Protocol, or a version of it - a mild keto diet, more exercise, structured sleep and frequent saunas (I read about a trial in Finland that suggested saunas can help prevent dementia.) My thought is that even if these changes do nothing to help reverse Alzheimers symptoms my Dad may feel more healthy which is a win in itself.

I am wary of contacting a Recode practitioner and getting fully onboard as they seem rather expensive for a largely unproven treatment.

Has anyone given the protocol or a version of it a go? I saw a post from Country Lady a while back but nothing since. I would be keen to hear others thoughts or experiences. I am also happy to provide updates on how my Dad gets on if anyone is interested.

Joe
Hi Joe
My mum has just been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. I am 3/4 way through reading the end of Alzheimer’s and we are considering trying the bredesen protocol for mum. After all the alternative of trying Aricept doesn’t seem that hopeful longer term.

Have you started the protocol with your dad? The only practitioners I can see are in London or Edinburgh (both a 4 hour drive for us) but worth it if it helps.
 

Sirena

Registered User
Feb 27, 2018
2,337
0
I agree with both @Jaded'n'faded and @canary

I haven't seen anyone return a year or two on and say this type of programme is working for them - and if it was, I'm sure they would want to share the news.

My mother is underweight and is fussy about her food, what she eats is mainly the opposite of keto, chips and cake. She is very stubborn and if she doesn't want to eat something, good luck trying. As for structured sleep, I have no idea how you would achieve that. She's always cold though so she might like a sauna, although I think she'd want to keep all her clothes on.