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Probe after man wrongly diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,453
0
South coast
Considering the fight that most of us have to go through to get a diagnosis - especially for early onset - the whole thing sounds extremely strange to me.
 

silver'lantern

Registered User
Apr 23, 2019
208
0
well...I cant believe seeing this here today. I had come on to ask the question.... 'Is it possible to get wrong diagnosis!' I am beginning to wonder if the person I am/was carer for really has dementia. Or certainly not at the level he had been suggesting. i am ata a loss and feel totally hoodwinked and taken for a mug
 

silver'lantern

Registered User
Apr 23, 2019
208
0
Ive been following your posts @silver'lantern . What makes you now think that he has been wrongly diagnosed?
really? you follow my posts .... thank you for showing an interest. at this stage i dont really want to go into full details so publicly. i was just looking through to see if there were any possibility. i am jut a bit deflated at the moment. but basically his sudden ability to go about everyday life now i have said i will no longer be his carer.
 
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Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
17,497
0
68
Toronto, Canada
It is quite sad for that poor man and doubly sad that his wife died before he was told it was a misdiagnosis. But unfortunately doctors do make mistakes, as everyone does. My uncle was told haemorrhoids were causing the blood in his stool. It was colon cancer and by the time he was correctly diagnosed, it was too late. The same thing happened to my FIL - he had had prostate cancer and when he complained of pains in his neck and back, he was told it was arthritis. Again, too late.

In an ideal world no one would make such mistakes. This is not an ideal world.
 

Starting on a journey

Registered User
Jul 9, 2019
887
0
The particular unit where this man was diagnosed is nurse led. This is where I took my mum, the nurse does the tests and interviews, shows notes to doctor who prescribes……we never saw a doctor!
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
25,106
0
North Manchester
The particular unit where this man was diagnosed is nurse led. This is where I took my mum, the nurse does the tests and interviews, shows notes to doctor who prescribes……we never saw a doctor!
Just had a look at relevant CQC
2022-05-17_222504 (Medium).png
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,827
0
Victoria, Australia
well...I cant believe seeing this here today. I had come on to ask the question.... 'Is it possible to get wrong diagnosis!' I am beginning to wonder if the person I am/was carer for really has dementia. Or certainly not at the level he had been suggesting. i am ata a loss and feel totally hoodwinked and taken for a mug
My husband was originally diagnosed with atypical Alzheimer’s on 8th July, 2014. In December last year he was considered by the consultant to be non diagnosed. I believe that my husband has some form of dementia and I have always thought that the consultant didn’t really know what was wrong in all the years he was treating him. He has had extensive testing twice, three years apart, by a highly qualified neuropsychologist and that revealed worsening cognitive defects.

I am quite miffed by the whole thing. I feel incredibly sorry for that poor man.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,453
0
South coast
The particular unit where this man was diagnosed is nurse led. This is where I took my mum, the nurse does the tests and interviews, shows notes to doctor who prescribes……we never saw a doctor!
Just had a look at relevant CQC
View attachment 65844
Was this the case in 2014? A lot can happen in 8 years.

The thing I find strangest is the way that he says that his life was curtailed because of the diagnosis. A diagnosis of dementia does not automatically mean that you cant do things - people with dementia can still pursue hobbies, go on holiday, drive and even work. It just depends on abilities. Why didnt the wife notice that he was not deteriorating?
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
25,106
0
North Manchester
I realise a lot can happen in 8 years, just wondered what latest CQC inspection said.

Maybe he appeared to be deteriorating and improved during the pandemic
But when the pandemic hit, he said he heard less from the hospital and was able to get on with life without having anyone around to reinforce this false diagnosis.
"Friends would ring me and say 'you seems like you're doing well' and I thought it was just them being nice," he said.
Also his medication appears to have had an adverse effect

"Since I've come off the medication I've become a completely different person - I now want answers."